To Top

Wednesday April 15 — Salmon and Subway

• CATEGORIES: Features • TAGS: .
2015-04-15-subway-truck1

I now have an additional reason to eat Subway sandwiches! This truck was in Albuquerque off of Wyoming Blvd.

Today was a breather day. Our simple goal was to make the four hour drive from Durango south to Albuquerque. Without anything planned, we let chance be our guide.

2015-04-15-durango-albuquerque-map

It turned out ‘chance’ liked jeeps on this day. On our way out of Durango we saw a flat fender, a cj-5, and a beautifully rusted truck (orange-red patina). Unfortunately, we were on a two-lane busy road with no pull-offs. All we could do is shout to one another, ‘there’s another jeep!”

After taking a wrong turn in Cortez, we found ourselves in Farmington, New Mexico, where we spotted two unusual vehicles. The first reminded me of a Tour FC with it’s white and red top.

2015-04-15-farmington-firetruck

The second was a limoseum parked out front of Farmington’s museum.

2015-04-15-limoseum1 2015-04-15-limoseum2

Despite the cool car, we didn’t go inside the museum. Instead, we got back on track and headed east for Bloomfield. That’s where we saw the strangest sign: SALMON RUINS. As you can imagine, we didn’t expect to find any salmon bones, carcasses or ruins in New Mexico. So, naturally, we had to investigate.

2015-04-15-salmon-ruins1

The name had us wondering just what this was.

It turned out the Salmon name had nothing to do with fish and everything to do with a settler family named Salmon who arrived in the 1800s and spent much of their lives protecting ruins that dated back to the 11th century. It’s in the family’s honor that that museum is named. And, in return, the museum site has conversed both the native ruins and the Salmon’s homestead.

2015-04-15-salmon-ruins2

Very New Mexico-esque building design

Most of the exhibits are outside and the museum provides a detailed walking tour booklet full of information. It’s too bad the museum doesn’t have the equivalent information on their website. Since I can’t remember many of the details, I’ll just show you some of the pictures.

2015-04-15-salmon-ruins6 2015-04-15-salmon-ruins5 2015-04-15-salmon-ruins4

2015-04-15-salmon-ruins3

Salmon homestead house

2015-04-15-salmon-ruins7

Cowboy bunk houses

The truth of the matter is that there are more spectacular remains at Chaco Canyon or Mesa Verde. There’s also Canyon of the Anicents National Monument (management by the BLM and not the NPS), but Ann and I didn’t realize it existed until tonight. It’s north across the highway from Mesa Verde. However, the Salmon Ruins do have an advantage over the others: they are easily accessible and Ann needs that.

After the museum, we continued south. Somewhere we must have made a huge navigational error, for we found ourselves in Cuba! I know that relations between the US and Cuba have warmed slightly, but you would’t know it from driving through this town. Clearly the economic sanctions have played havoc with it!

2015-04-15-cuba3

This was the visitor’s center for Cuba. The windows are impenetrable due to the metal security mesh. We didn’t feel so welcome, so we ran back to the jeep.

2015-04-15-cuba1

This lovely building is right across the street from the visitor’s center.

2015-04-15-cuba2

This bizarre hospitality sign welcomed visitors to Cuba. It’s worn veneer mimic’s the place.

Following Cuba, we made the remainder of our drive to Albuquerque (where there are a ton of inexpensive motels — best prices I’ve seen in any of our travels).  After we unpacked at our motel, we ran over to get some cheese and fruit at the grocery store. That’s when we saw this awesome truck! It wasn’t just for show; it was a driver.

2015-04-15-subway-truck3 2015-04-15-subway-truck2

On Thursday we plan to do a few things around Albuquerque, then we’ll either spend a second night or head down to stay a few nights with Ann’s aunt and uncle in Tularosa, New Mexico.

 

 

5 Comments on “Wednesday April 15 — Salmon and Subway

  1. Scotty

    If time permits take the tram to Sandia peak, great lunch spot on top easy access all the way. For breakfast Wecks is it, nice side trip is to drive up Sandia from the backside for sunset drive back towards city as sun sets in horizon

  2. Rick

    I hope you were prepared for the ticket price, if you took the tram up to the Sandia peaks? Too much for my budget! And I live here! If you aren’t in a hurry, take I-25 south and get off at Isleta, follow Rte 47 down through Bosque (boskee) Farms, penalty, Los Lunas and Belen ( bell en) and on down to Rte 60, then back onto I -25 and south to Socorro, Truth Or consequences (commonly referred to as T. Or C. And on down to Las Cruces, El Paso, and on across Texas from there. ) You’ll miss some interesting sights if you stay on the freeway all the way. We live up near the mountains, between Belen and Los Lunas. Our back door has a spectacular view of the Manzanos Mts. the sunsets are a beautiful orange most of the time. And the mountains re breathtaking in winter, when covered with snow.

  3. mmdeilers Post author

    Thanks Rick and Scotty for the ideas:

    Scotty: no can do on the tram. One of my wife’s PTSD issues is heights. She said she’d have to be drunk or on her anxiety pills to go up the tram (the pills make her check out for about 12 hours).

    One thing we do plan to do is drive the “America the Beautiful” portion of Route 66, the one where the road sings if you drive the right speed :-). We also have a museum, old town, and a grave site to visit.

    Craig: Now that you say it, I think we saw one of these at the Natmus a couple years ago: http://www.ewillys.com/2013/06/20/monday-june-17th-three-museums-steve/#more-133186

    Mike: I’m glad you came up with that. I didn’t know how to search for that name!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Subscribe without commenting