Features Research Archives

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WWI Four Wheel Drive Star — Nash Quad

• CATEGORIES: Features, Unusual • TAGS: , .

It was one of those days where I was searching for one thing and found another:  The Nash Quad Truck (the truck to the right is a 1919 Nash Quad, Owned by Bruce and Melanie Rice #8880).  These are 4wD with four wheel steering.  (see the video below to see a quad and its steering in action)

It turns out, these were a big hit during World War I.  In the Story of the Jeep, Patrick Foster writes that the Quad ” … dramatically proved it’s worth … and proved the value of four wheel drive …”

Here’s a brief history from the Pioneer Flight Museum:

The Nash Quad was first manufactured in 1914 by the Thomas B. Jeffrey Company, which was located in Kenosha, Wisconsin. It became quite popular during World War I and was used by the armed forces of not only the United States, but also Russia, France and Britain. One of the first motor vehicles to offer four-wheel drive, the Quad proved very suitable to the rough, unpaved roads of the time. In 1916, Jeffrey sold the production rights to the Nash company. Because of its popularity, it was produced in large numbers, including license production by Hudson, National, and Paige-Detroit. Exact numbers aren’t known, but apparently over 11,000 were produced in 1918 alone.

Here’s a video of a Nash Quad being started and driven:

 
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The Evolution of Water Fording

• CATEGORIES: CJ-3A, Features, Old Images • TAGS: , .

One of the more interesting early modifications for water fording is visible  in the picture below.  Note how the jeep facing the reader has the exhaust vented out the front of the grill with the muffler laying parrallel to the grille.  I can’t say I’d ever seen that before.

The CJ-3A.info page notes: “The recommended maximum fording depth of an unmodified jeep was 21 inches. That is about the height of the fuel pump and transfer case vents. Any deeper and things would start to fill up with water. Even at this relatively shallow depth the Technical Manual (2) advised that the generator brace should be “pulled up to release tension on the fan belt and stop the fan from throwing water over the engine”. That would be important in order to keep water off the ignition system. During a combat landing the 21″ maximum fording depth was not adequate.”

Read more about the Evolution of Water Fording here

 
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30 Epic Failures at Jalopnik.com

• CATEGORIES: Features, Website

This list of 30 images of epic failures from Jalopnik.com was funny.  I’m sure we could all add a pic or two to this list.

“We’ve seen some pretty crappy DIY craftsmanship before, but these examples take the cake. What’s amazing is these DIY’ers know how to post on the internet, but not how to research.”

Here’s a couple images:

too_high_epicfail1

tootall_epicfail2

 
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Giant Flatfender Jeep in Dubai

• CATEGORIES: Artists/Drawings, Features, Monuments/Statues, Museums

UPDATE:  Joshua alerted me to The May edition of JP Magazine.  It provides some information on the giant jeep shown below. The jeep is located in Dubai.  I thought it was just a fake prop of some kind, but apparently it’s being built on the framework of a large quarry mining truck.  Click here to read the brief news piece in JP Magazine (scroll halfway down).

monster_jeep_statue

Here’s a second pic from this page at JP Magazine:

 

 

 
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Bill Mauldin’s Willys Cartoons

• CATEGORIES: Artists/Drawings, Features, Magazine, News • TAGS: .

smithsonian_cover_1992As I mentioned in a post when I first launched eWillys, which appears to have disappeared in last year’s database disaster, one of my favorite Jeep Cartoons was drawn by Bill Mauldin and placed on the front of the November 1992 issue of the Smithsonian Magazine.  You can see that one to the right (or see a larger version here).  No doubt many of you have seen this before.  At the time I wrote the post, it never occurred to me to search for any other cartoons by Bill.

However, for mystical reasons that remain unclear, it occurred to me tonight to search for other ‘Willys’ cartoons by Bill.  Here’s the results of my search. (send me others or links to others if you know of more ….

billmauldin1Th’ hell with it, sir. Let’s go back to the front.

billmaudlin2Thanks

billmauldlin3Why ya lookin’ so sad? I got out of it okay.

billmaudlin4 I’ll never splash mud on a dogface again (999) … I’ll never splash mud on a dogface again (1000) … Now will ya help us push?

billmaudlin6It’s a habit Joe picked up in Rome.

Here’s more links about Bill

 
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A Brief History of the Cannonball Run

• CATEGORIES: Features, News

cannonballToday, as usual, I was browsing CNN when I came across a list of the ‘10 best’ car chases on film.  I’m not sure if these really are the best 10, but one item that did catch my eye was the note attached to #10, the Cannonball run about George Baker.

I’d  heard of the Cannonball Run, but didn’t really know anything about it other than the casual reference to a movie by that name until last summer.  One day last summer I was browsing the new books section of my library and came across a book called The Driver, by Alexander Roy.  That provided me some background on the race, with which I’ll end this post.

Note:  I’m no expert on rally racing or it’s history, nor much of an expert on anything at all, but I’ve never let that stop me from writing anything else.  So, here’s a brief Cannonball history for those that like this sort of thing.

Mr. Cannonball Express:

In 1915, Erwin George Baker drove a Stutz Bearcat across the country in only 11+ days (this was one of 143 driving records of various kinds he set).  The next year he drove a Cadillac 8 from LA to NY in only 7 days.  This feat earned him the nickname (or a reference of) the Cannonball Express.

The Cannonball Express was a reference to the fastest train, at least at the turn of the century, that motored between Chicago and New Orleans.  It’s the same train that was operated by the immortalized Casey Jones, who would be killed at the reins of the train, attempting to slow it before it crashed into boxcars.

Continue reading

 
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Austin 7 — Grandfather of the Jeep?

• CATEGORIES: Bantam-FordGP-WillysMA-EarlyJPs, Features, Unusual • TAGS: .

So, I’m doing my best to avoid going out to my parents very cold, damp garage to finish fixing my mom’s car.  Of course, the internet is one of the best avoidance tools ever invented.

FLAT FENDER BABES:
On a lark, I typed in ‘Flat Fender Babes’ into google just to see if anything came up.  While most of the links were garbage, one link lead me to a list of significant production automobiles, created by Angry Stan at AngryStan’s blog.  Naturally, one of the vehicles listed was the Willys MB.  What was interesting about the MB’s inclusion was Stan’s comment that the MB was “very loosely based on the Austin 7”.

Whoa .. news to me.  What you talkin’ ’bout Stan?

Continue reading

 
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The History MB-CJ3B Willys-Viasa

• CATEGORIES: CJ-3B, Features, International • TAGS: .

Here’s a good history of the MB-CJ3B Willys-Viasa with a variety of pics.

In the late 50’s, Willys Overland gave the rights to the V.I.A.S.A. firm to allow them exclusively to build the Univesal Jeep in our country. In 1959, the first permit to import parts and machinery is given by the Trade Ministry, in order to assemble the first units  in the V.I.A.S.A’s factory located in Zaragoza. These units weren’t launched until 1960.

It seems that that permit let V.I.A.S.A build the CJ3B model, with different engines and features from the original American model …”

Learn more about the Viasa here

 
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Builds — David and friends

• CATEGORIES: Builds, CJ-2A, CJ-3A, Features

David and his friends transport themselves back in time each each fall by getting out their jeeps, heading to the woods, and cleaning brush, trees and other obstacles out of the way in preparation for winter snowmobiling in New York.

David’s owned his (the gray ’51 CJ-3A) for six years.  His friends have owned their 1947 CJ-2A and 1949 CJ-3A for about 25 years.  Thanks for sharing David.

david_wyre4

Continue reading

 
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Fred Smith, Rare Jeep Collector

• CATEGORIES: Bantam-FordGP-WillysMA-EarlyJPs, Features, GPA (SEEP) • TAGS: , .

While reading through the extensive history of the half track, I stumbled on the fact that the owner of the rarest of these half tracks was Fred Smith of the UK.  Having recently read that Fred Smith also owned and nicely restored the Ford Budd prototype, I got curious about who Fred Smith is.  At this point, I don’t know anything about him other than he’s got quite the jeep collection.  Here’s an approximate list (this list is a guess based on what I’ve read online):

  1. 1940 Ford Budd Prototype
  2. T-28 Half Track
  3. Willys MT-TUG 6×6
  4. 5 or 6 Ford GPs
  5. Ford GP four wheel steering
  6. Ford GPA (seep)
  7. Willys MA
  8. Willys MB

Not a bad collection!  Apparently, Fred shows these on occasion (or often) at the War and Peace Show at Beltring in Kent, UK.

 
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Spicer & Dana: Where did the Spicer 18 come from?

• CATEGORIES: Features, Transfer Cases • TAGS: .

spicer_manufacturingI spent some time earlier to day trying to track down what came before the Spicer 18 transfer case.  Unfortunately, I can’t find anything such as a Spicer 12 or a Spicer 3 anywhere.  If the Spicer 18 was the Dana Corp’s first try at a transfer case, then it’s entirely reasonable to say they hit a homer with it, as it stayed in the jeep (though ratios and other minor changes were made) from 1941 to 1971, when the jeep started using a center pumpkin and the Dana 20 transfer case.

So, here’s some interesting facts I learned during my searches.

  • The Dana Corp was originally founded as the Spicer Corp by Charles Spicer in 1904 when he was 29 to manufacture universal joints.  Here’s an 83 page PDF book of the first 100 years of the company.
  • The Spicer Corp’s success seems to be the result of the industry standardization around their products due to their high quality and competitive pricing.
  • In June of 1940 during a meeting between Bantam, government, Spicer and Timken representatives, Bantam and Spicer worked out the details of the drive train, for which Spicer received 130,000 for the tooling costs. (from the m38a1 site).  The front end was also worked out during this meeting by an engineer from Spicer.
  • While the Willys used the passenger side drop transfer case (a spicer 18), the Ford Pygmy (Ford’s prototype jeep) and the Bantam BRC Mark I (the very first jeep prototype) and the BRC-60/Mark II (Bantam’s 2nd prototype) relied on a driver side drop transfer case from spicer that was also a Spicer 18. (Here’s more about it)
  • I could only find 4 spicer transfer cases.  The Spicer 18, 20, 23 (for Chevrolet 4wd conversions) and 24 (for Ford 4wd conversions) (see Napco history).  There’s likely more, I just didn’t find any info about them.
  • Charles Dana joined in 1913, injecting money into the company.  In a couple years, Charles assumed the presidency.
  • In 1946, the company was officially renamed the Dana Corp, which by that time was a holding company for Spicer as well as Parish, Salisbury, Brown-Lipe and others.  The idea was to continue using the brand Spicer for the drive train products due to the strong brand name.  For some reason, that’s not clear to me, over time the Spicer brand name seemed to disappear in favor of the Dana name.

Here’s some other links about this early history:

 
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Builds — Oklahoma Green and One Bad Apple

• CATEGORIES: Builds, CJ-3A, Features • TAGS: .

I was searching for an image of original CJ-3A gauges when i stumbled upon this article.  Both of these are well modified, good looking road and trail jeeps.  One of the more interesting features of the ‘Oklahoma Green’ Jeep is the number of gauges that are installed.  One Bad Apple certainly has an usual paint job.

Here’s 2 excerpts from an Off Road Adventures Article; each one discuss a little bit about each jeep:

oklahoma_greenOklahoma Green: “… Below the CJ3A Willys’ windshield is a dashboard that would be more than adequate in a J3 Super Cub airplane of the same vintage. The aircraft-like dash sports a full compliment of gauges: fuel, fuel pressure, oil pressure, oil temp, water temp, vacuum, and air pressure gauges along with a voltmeter, hourmeter, and altimeter by Hobbs. A Lev-O-Gauge rounds out the impressive array. Lights and buzzers backup the critical gages. From the dash, Ken can switch on the fuel pump, fast idle solenoid, headlights, heater, and winch. Indicator lights report the status of 4WD, seat belts, ARB, emergency brake, and air compressor…. ”

one_bad_appleOne Bad Apple: “… The frame was lengthened 6-inches to incorporate a GM 4.3 V6 CMFI 195 hp at 4500 rpm engine with K&N Air Cleaner and Painless Wiring, a GM 700R4 with a manual shift kit, and a Dana 300 transfer case with CV driveshaft. With 4.88 gears, the final crawl ratio is 80:1. The front axle is a Dana 30 with an ARB Air Locker and disk brakes. The rear axle is a Dana 44 with a Detroit Locker. Four-inch lift springs, an off-road track bar, and Rancho 5000 Shocks control 33×12.50 BFG Mud Terrain T/As …..”

Check out the full article here

 
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Readers Builds — William’s 1948 CJ-2A

• CATEGORIES: Builds, CJ-2A, Features

William, a reader from Costa Rica, contacted me this weekend with a question.  After exchanging a few emails, he offered to share his project with readers.  The 1st picture was taken in April of 2005 and the second in November of 2007.  He has made some nice improvements that have made this jeep look much better.  You can see all the pics here at cardomain.com.  Thanks for sharing William!

1948_cj2a_castillo_costarica

1948_cj2a_castillo_costarica2

 
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Working Jeeps from Offroad Adventures

• CATEGORIES: CJ-2A, CJ-3A, Features, Website

offroad_adventures_workingjeepsI’m not familiar with the “Offroad Adventures” publication.  Instead, as usual, I stumbled upon it while looking for something else.  It’s a compact 2 pages article with a variety of pics of cjs accompanied by different hydraulic implements.  I’m not a big fan of the myvirtualpaper’s interface, but the pics are still cool.

See the working jeeps article

 
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1947 Empire Tractor (uses Willys drive train) Drexel, Mo $3500

• CATEGORIES: CJ-2A, Features, Machinery, MB, Unusual • TAGS: , .

1947_empiretractor_drexelWell here’s something I didn’t know, submitted by a reader.  Empire Tractors were built from parts that are also used by Willys, such as the transfercase (spicer 18), transmission (t-90), differential (spicer 25) and more.  You can learn more about the specs for these tractors here.  Note that the seller claims these were built out of surplus WWII jeeps, however the t-90 was a CJ-2A tranny, so it seems more likely to me that they shared parts with the CJ-2A rather than built from the MB.

“HERE WE HAVE A RARE 1947 EMPIRE TRACTOR. MODEL 88-90 MADE IN 11-47 SERAIL NUMBER 6352 IT WAS RESTORED ABOUT 10 YEARS AGO AND HAS BEEN KEPT INSIDE ALL IT’S LIFE. THIS HAS WILLYS JEEP ENGINE AND TRANS,AND ALOT OF OTHER JEEP PARTS IN IT,THAT ARE ORGINAL TO THE TRACTOR. THESE TRACTORS WERE BUILT AFTER WWII OUT OF SURPLUS ARMY JEEPS. THE PAINT SHOWS SOME WEAR . THE TIRES ON BACK ARE ORGINAL AND FRONTS HAVE BEEN REPALCED. COMES WITH ORGINAL LIGHTS AND GENERATOR IN A BOX. IT HAS HAD ONLY 3 OWNERS AND RUNS AND DRIVES LIKE IT SHOULD, READY TO USE OR SHOW. THIS COMES WITH A BELLY SICKLE MOWER,THAT HAS NOT BEEN USED IN 20 YEARS. 3500 FIRM. MY NUMBER IS 660-267-3282 THANKS FOR LOOKING”

http://www.empiretractor.net/spec.html

 
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Reader Builds — All Jewels Flattie

• CATEGORIES: Builds, CJ-3A, Features, stainless/jewels

A reader wanted to share a pic of this beautiful all Jewels Flatfender he built over many years and recently sold.  He says he already is at work on another jeep.  Hopefully, he’ll provide us with some updates as works on his new project.

randy_jewels_flatfender

 
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Reproduction Data Decals for CJ-5

• CATEGORIES: CJ5, Features, Website

28_autod300wWhile looking up transmissions for the T-98 post, I came across a website that has CJ-5 decals you can purchase.  The website offers VIN Stickers, Data plate decals, Tailgate decals,  and more.  The website carries a wide variety of data stickers.  Check it out.

If I wanted to use a sticker, the one to the right would work perfectly, even though it’s designed for a “3 speed Auto D300 Twin”.

 
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My call with Don Prine about Stainless Steel and More …

I spoke with Don Prine today (12/24/08).  Don lives and runs a shop outside of Tacoma, Washington.  I quickly learned that Don is quite the character.  If I remember correctly, Don said he’s 91 years old and it’s clear to me he has no plans to retire.  He’s at the shop regularly and he’ll be there on the 26th, he told me, snow permitting.

Don’s been in the jeep business for 40+ years.  He told me stories of purchasing surplus jeeps in lots (one time 80 m38a1s), or as he put it, ‘the bank and I purchased them’.  We talked about some of the other jeeps he had purchased and  we exchanged some names of people we both knew in the Jeeping world.  Then he kindly provided me several contacts of his own in the Boise area he said I should call.  It did not take me long to figure out that Don has friends  everywhere.

Continue reading

 
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Brian goes to Vienna and all we get are jeep pics ;-)

• CATEGORIES: Features, MB, Museums

Brian, who’s now our Visiting European Correspondent (did I mention it’s a volunteer position?), found this beautiful MB in Vienna at the Heeresgeschichtliches Museum while visiting Vienna, Austria.  Brian mentions that this museum of military history contains ‘everything from 1600 on up’ that’s war related.

Brian writes:

“This jeep was extremely clean. It is in such great condition that I wondered if it is a repo-tub.   The only thing missing was the radio that mounts behind the driver.  They indicate this jeep was used for patrols.  Note the four allied flags: Russia, British, American and French; the jeep was issued to all four allied forces policing Austria and the flags denoted that no one country was ruling Austria.”

brian_mb_viena

brian_mb_viena2

 
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Volkswagen Jeep Kit Sun Valley, Ca eBay

• CATEGORIES: Features, Unusual, VEEP (VW Jeep), Scamp, Others

UPDATE:  This sold for $810 on Jan 1 2009

Maybe there are more of these VW kits than I realized.  This is the fourth I’ve seen for sale this year.  While the seller claims this is a 1942 body, all the kits, including this one, appear to me to use a version of the M-38 body (or replica body).

“YOU ARE BIDDING ON A 1942 WILLYS JEEP BODY ON A VOLKSWAGEN DRIVE TRAIN / CHASSIS. THIS CAR HAS A 1600 ENGINE WITH A VW MANUAL TRANSMISSION. THE EXTERIOR COLOR IS RED AND RED INTERIOR WITH BROWN BUCKET SEATS. THE TIRES ARE IN FAIR CONDITION AND BRAKES ARE GOOD ALSO. THIS CAR HAS BEEN IN STORAGE AND HAS NOT BEEN STARED FOR 7 YEARS BUT THE MOTOR TURNS OVER….”

View all the pics on eBay

 
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Reader Question: Wiper Shafts Too Long … Options?

• CATEGORIES: Features, How To

A reader wrote to me asking for some input regarding some replacement electric windshield wipers.  I couldn’t answer his question and, in fact, I’ll have the same problem once I install my electric wipers.  Here’s what he wrote:

” I just bought the electric wiper conversion kit from Omix-ada, but the instructions are limited to the wiring diagram. As you can see from the picture, the shaft length would seem to cause a problem in a direct exchange. I have thought of cutting down the shafts(inner and outer) but wonder if I’m missing something easier. I have Googled the web to see if any one has discussed the conversion, so far no luck. I wonder if you or any of your readers has used these. Any help or comments would be appreciated. Thanks Phil”

So, if anyone has any ideas, we’d both appreciate it!

 
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Before there were Paddle Tires

• CATEGORIES: Features, Tires and Rims

I was looking to see if anyone has generated a list of the top 15 things (or list of some kind) you should look at when evaluating the purchase of an older flattie for an upcoming post.

While looking for such a list, I ran across this article by a Willie Worthy (it turns out he wrote a number of tire histories), a writer for Four Wheeler Magazine. He takes a quick look back at how his life has changed and how it has remained the same. One of the more interesting descriptions he provides are the old school paddle tires.

Willie writes, “my first Jeep came with some military nondirectional 6.00-16s that were replaced with some 7.00-16s in a heavy-lugged mud and snow pattern. When I bought my new CJ-5 in the fall of 1962, it came with some 7.50-15s, which I quickly sold. By now, I was into tires and building rims. The tires of choice were some passenger-car 8.20-15 recaps spread out on my homemade 8-inch-wide rims. Later, I, and just about everyone I knew, was using Armstrong’s flotation tires, or similar versions of them that were originally designed for farm implements. Traction didn’t come from the straight grooves running the circumference of the tire but from their ability to conform to an obstacle. Soon we found that cross-grooving made for much better traction. The Pismo dunes, and those at Glamis, were wide open with no restrictions, and by the mid to late ’60s, we needed more traction than these tires would provide. Before the advent of paddle tires, we would cross-groove drag slicks in various patterns and mount them on 12- to 14-inch-wide homemade rims.”

 
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Reader’s Build: Michael’s 1957 and 1955 Trucks

• CATEGORIES: Features, News

Michael writes that he’s owned several jeeps through the years.  Currently, he’s got two willys trucks he’s fixed up, a ’55 and a ’57 .  As you can see from the right and the first large pic below, the ’57 seems to have wings.  Most recently, he’s purchased a couple slat grille jeeps and is looking for info about and parts for them.

“Just wanted to say thanks for all the awesome info on your website! I learned to drive at the age of 10. My parents had a 1969 Jeep Gladiator Pickup. I used to fourwheel all over in it. It was given to me on my 12th birthday after I had blown up the motor wheeling in a rock canyon very similar to the Rubicon. What a time. We towed it back with a 56 Willys Wagon.

I currently own a couple Willys pickups a 55 and a 57. I’ve owned a couple 2a’s in the past and always kick myself for selling them! I am back though and looking for any info. on parts for a couple of slat Willys. That’s how I found your website. Thanks again. I’ll send you a picture of my 57′ “treading lightly?” Also pics of both are posted on car domain under the user name of UNIVERSALWILLYS1 (although it was hurriedly done so not very prof. looking.I need the time to fix them)”

 
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Book Review: The Jeep (book) by the Olyslager Organisation

• CATEGORIES: Bantam-FordGP-WillysMA-EarlyJPs, Books, Features, Unique Jeeps, Unusual • TAGS: .

I don’t know when or where it came from, but at some point my parents obtained a book simply titled “The Jeep“.  It was mostly a picture book, which as a young kid was perfectly fine with me.  I open and looked through it many, many times. Ok, I still open it ….

However, it wasn’t just a book with a few pics of jeeps you see everyday.  Instead, it’s a slim book full of a wide range of pictures.  Of course, there’s the standard bantam, mb, seep, gpw, etc. But, there’s also, for example, 3 images of the Willys/Nuffied modified airborne jeep, seen to the right (though not from the book — it’s from a russian site — the book images of the Willys/Nuffield are at the bottom of this post).

I bring this up, as I ran across a copy of the book at the Boise Library today.  So, I snapped a few images of the pictures with my digital camera (hence the poor quality – purchase the book to see them sharply) and will post a some of them.

I haven’t asked for permission to post them (I TRIED to, but can’t find the contact info for them), so I’ll add this pitch for the book.  This book is a must for any jeep nut.  While it’s a fairly small book with only 64 pages, the collectors prices (at amazon) were hovering around $45. It’s a perfect size for your kids.  The organization responsible for publishing the book is the Olyslager Foundation (link?), which has published a number of other cool books listed at the Open Library Project.

Now for some cool, but poor quality pics to wet your appetite…

One of my favorite sections of the book show how quickly a crate jeep can be put together.  The book documents this particular group only took 3 minutes and 31 seconds to put it togther.

Check out the rest of the pics …..

Continue reading

 
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South Webster High School “Jeeps”

• CATEGORIES: Features, News

Who woulda thunk it?  It turns out South Webster High School in Ohio adopted the Jeep mascot more than 50 years go.  Though it’s not jeep the vehicle, rather it’s Jeep from Popeye, it’s still cool in my book.

“Before 1940, South Webster High School athletic teams had no official name, although local sportswriters sometimes referred to them as the “midgets.

However, in 1940 the rules of basketball, by accident, helped to produce the mighty JEEP. By the rule in 1940, coaches were not permitted on the playing floor to instruct players. Coaching had to be done prior to the start of the game or at half-time. During rest periods between the first and third quarters of play the team manager at South Webster would roll a small box onto the court to supply players with refreshments and first-aid materials. However, the coach at South Webster was accused (and rightly so perhaps) of sending in plays and instructive notes in this little four-wheeled box. Local fans were positive that when that little box was sent onto the floor, players were getting more than refreshments. Everyone knew that the box contained answers to the problems being presented by the opposing team.

Also in 1940, a favorite comic strip contained a character who knew everything. In 1936, the charater of “Eugene the Jeep,” a small bright-eyed creature from Africa who was all-knowing, was introduced into the “Popeye” comic strip. Popeye gave the Jeep to his girlfriend, Olive Oyl, as a birthday gift. The Jeep, whose diet consisted of orchids, helped popeye solve many difficult situations in his comic strip career.

Since the JEEP was all-knowing, some local South Webster people associated the coach’s box, containing messages to his players, with the comic strip character.

According to, what is now legend, the late Mayor of South Webster, Mr. Gilbert Havener, is credited as the first person to label the box as the “JEEP BOX.” The sports editor of The Portsmouth Times (now Daily Times), Lynn Wittenberg, picked up the term and used it in describing South Webster’s 1940 Scioto Country Tournament team.

The mascot was never officially adopted, but has been, since 1940, generally accepted….”

Learn More Here