Features Research Archives

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1941 Full-Page Article on the Jeep

This is a second full-page article on the jeep, this time with two large photos in the May 04, 1941, issue of the St. Louis Globe-Democrat.

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Year? Jeepney Riverside, CA $15,000

• CATEGORIES: Features, Other 4x4s • TAGS: .

It doesn’t run at the moment. It has a Missouri title for some reason. There’s nothing to indicate it is a 1946 or was ever a WW2 jeep.

https://www.facebook.com/marketplace/item/687047558645517

“$15,000 Here is the real deal WW2 willys Jeep Jeepney from the Philippines. Was built in the 1960’s with old war Jeeps left behind. This is a real deal with Isuzu diesel and 4 speed transmission. Old owner was a maga millionaire that took his family in the annual parade every year in this. It was part of the Schats bakery collection. Has a clean Missouri title and had over $5000 invested in the running gear years ago. Been sitting maybe 4 years and will run and drive in a few hours.”

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Article and Photos of the Bantam T2E1

UPDATE: This article from August 28, 1941, published in the Daily News (New York City), describes the Bantam BRC-40 T2E1. This is the second generation of of the T2E1, (reportedly, the first generation of the T2E1 had a the full body, which itself was a derivation of the T2, an anti-tank jeep that had the gun between the seats; however, there apparently is some debate on how to define the versions).

Also mentioned below is the Ford Swamp Angel. I’ll have more info on that in an upcoming post.

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This is a T2E1 from an angle I’ve never seen. It was published yesterday on the Quest Masters Museum Facebook page:

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Originally published May 31, 2020:

An article from 1941 appears to describe the T2E1 Bantams shown in photos below (a few more photos here also).  The article describes the rifles as 47mm, while the photo captions correctly describe the rifle as a 37mm. Perhaps the difference is that the article was written in July, while the photos were taken late in August? So, maybe, 47mm rifles might have been initially considered? (47mm anti-tank guns were developed by France as early as 1931)

This article was published July 21, 1941, in the Lansing State Journal out of Michigan:

Clipping from Lansing State Journal - Newspapers.com

#1 Originally posted 01/31/2014:

This is likely a reprint, but still a good photo of the Bantam BRC-40 T2E1.

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#2 Posted August of 2018:

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“Streamlined” Jeeps From the Pacific

• CATEGORIES: Features, Magazine, Sedan-jeep • TAGS: , .

UPDATE: This post has been updated with a better version of the video:

The photos below are snapshots from the above video. They resemble the jeep shown below that was built by Wayne K. Pike. It was built by members of the 9th Service Squadron at the 13th Army Air Base on the island of Moratai. Note that it has a chrome/stainless trim strip absent from the car featured in the Popular Mechanics article below.

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ORIGINAL POST FEBRUARY 11, 2013:  You can view the entire Popular Mechanics’ issue on Google.

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Dec 1945 Popular Mechanics Page 6 Streamlined Jeep

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Dec 1945 Popular Mechanics Page 72 Jeep with Odd Body

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Dec 1945 Popular Mechanics Page 77 Men using Jeep like a plow horse

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Dec 1945 Popular Mechanics Page 73 Men us jeep to fix propeller

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Dec 1945 Popular Mechanics Page 70 Fixing Jeep Frame

 
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RedYcut Ford GPA Amphibious Model Jeep on eBay

• CATEGORIES: Features, GPA (SEEP), Models

Not many of these Amphibious jeep Ford GPA models around.

View all the information on eBay

“THIS AUCTION IS FOR ONE/1 REDYCUT U.S. ARMY AMPHIBIAN JEEP WOOD KIT IN ORIGINAL BOX
THE KIT LOOKS TO BE COMPLETE.
DIRECTIONS INCLUDED
A NICE EXAMPLE OF THIS RARE WOOD AMPHIBIAN JEEP MODEL KIT.
HARD TO FIND IN THIS CONDITION.”

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Fleet of Toy Jeeps on eBay

• CATEGORIES: Features, toys

The seller indicates these were from M*A*S*H toy sets.

View all the information on eBay

“Metal diecast US military jeeps and trailers, 18 Jeeps and 16Trailers, made by Zylmex, 1983. 12 are OD green, 6 are desert camouflaged. First time I saw them was in the 1980’s they sold as part of M*A*S*H* sets. Selling to reduce my collection of soldiers and vehicles. Scale is possibly HO scale. Condition is “Used”.”

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Philippos Jeep Models

• CATEGORIES: Features, Models

UPDATE: Philippos has created some newer jeep models, this time building it based on a pic of a Ford GP that was modified into a crane. However, instead of a Ford GP, he made it a Bantam BRC-40. Here’s the original pic:

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https://www.facebook.com/groups/WWIIG503/permalink/10157377382976046/

Here is the model (FB link):

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1941 Photo of Bantam at DC Steps **SOLD**

• CATEGORIES: Bantam-FordGP-WillysMA-EarlyJPs, Features, Old Images

UPDATE: **SOLD** Was on eBay. This photo was floating one of the Facebook groups, but didn’t include the caption, which describes the passengers. This was originally published here Dec 23, 2014. 

The question of the license plate came up on Facebook (as in, why does it have a license plate), while the question of “giant jeep” came up in a previous post on eWillys. The thing that’s been a head scratcher for me is that this jeep is carrying three grown men in the front, with space between the driver and the two passengers.

What is for certain is that in May 1941 Charles Payne (exec assistant to Bantam President Frank Fenn), was in Washington to promote Bantam’s efforts (see newspaper article at the bottom of this post). 

So, thinking out loud, is it possible that the below verbiage is true, that Bantam made a “giant” or larger jeep to promote its effort to obtain a contract? It would explain why it has dealer plates (as it wasn’t owned by the military). Here’s a comparison with another face-front Bantam:

1941-brc40-comparison-photos

Photo on the left is a press photo with a standard Bantam BRC-40. The one on the right is the press photo with Congress men and Bantam Rep Charles Payne.

The angle of the jeep on the right going up the steps makes it appear a little larger, so that’s not helpful. One unusual aspect is that it seems to sit taller, with a greater distance between the tires and the front fenders; yet, the spring shacks still have more play in them than the photo on the left. However, all this could be the effect of being on the stairs with six people piled in it.

The license plate, unless enlarged, suggests that the jeep on the left is not giant, but rather a standard sized jeep. Therefore, my suspicion is that this isn’t a larger jeep. So, why the “giant jeep” comment was used by the reporter is still a mystery to me. Thoughts?

From the original eBay ad: “A Vintage1941 Original Photo depicting a Giant Jeep carrying politicians in Washington D.C. The vehicle was made by the makers of the U.S. Army’s newest midget to promote their new vehicle to the suits in Washington. The small four-wheel drive utility vehicles would become an icon of World War II. Original press stamp and caption with a MAY 25 1941 stamp date are on the verso.”

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This photo was published in the May 26, 1941, issue of the Star Tribune out of Minneapolis, Minnesota:

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This article from May 04, 1941, published in the Dayton Daily News (Ohio) provides additional information on Charles Payne’s visit, but doesn’t elaborate on the “Giant Jeep”, which may have been an Associate Press reporter creation:

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1941 Articles, What is a Jeep?

• CATEGORIES: Features, Old News Articles

This first column describes seven different uses for the term ‘jeep’. It appeared in the November 15, 1941, issue of the News Journal, out of Mansfield, Ohio:

1941-11-15-news-journal-mansfield-oh-what-is-a-jeep

A few days later, this blurb was part of a column called the Daily Knave, published November 18, 1941. It highlights some of the alternative uses of the term “jeep”.

1941-11-18-oakland-tribune-what-is-a-jeep

 
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1962? Chicago Fire Department Parade Clown FC-170

• CATEGORIES: Features, Old Images

This photo was floating around Facebook. It shows a Chicago Fire Department FC-170 dressed up as a clown carrier. Anyone know where the photo originated (the FB poster didn’t know). He did have a date of 12/5/1962.

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1941 Article with Ford GP

This photo and article featuring a Ford GP was published June 09, 1941, in the Democrat and Chronicle out of Rochester, New York. It highlighted Major Harry Miller’s jeep modification, which added a 37MM gun to the rear of the vehicle.

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Originally posted February 07, 2015:  This post emphasized the Camp Lewis connection.

This June 9, 1941, article from the Spokane Daily Chronicle notes the Ford GP belongs to a Fort Lewis unit visiting California for maneuvers.

1941-06-09-spokane-daily-chronicle-fordgp

 
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1949 Ad for the Universal Jeep

• CATEGORIES: Advertising & Brochures, Features

What I found curious about this advertisement is that it sounds more like one from 1945 or 1946, rather than 1949. Published January 23, 1949, the ad by Fort Worth Willys-Overland seems to be trying to introduce readers to this ‘new concept’ of an automobile. However, it does so without invoking the four-in-one-vehicle concept used in the early years. Had Fort Worth Star-Telegram readers never seen or heard of a civilian jeep?

1949-01-23-fort-worth-star-telegram-jeep-ad-lores

 
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FC-150 Narrow Track Cuff Links on eBay

• CATEGORIES: Advertising & Brochures, Features

Maury shared these super cool FC-150 narrow track cuff links. They are priced at $99.

View all the information on eBay

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“Very Rare Vintage late 1950’s / early 1960’s Silver Willys FC-150 Cufflinks in Tarnished but Very Good Used Condition. Stamped “NB” and “STERLING” on the inside surface of both backings.

The Jeep Forward Control is a truck that was produced by Willys Motors, later named Kaiser Jeep, from 1956 to 1965. It was also assembled in other international markets. The layout featured a cab over (forward control) design.
The Forward Control models were primarily marketed as work vehicles for corporate, municipal, military, as well as civilian use. Regular pickup box beds were standard, but customers were offered a large number of “Jeep approved” specialized bodies from outside suppliers. These ranged from simple flatbeds to complete tow trucks, dump trucks, and fire trucks. The vehicles were also manufactured under license in India and Spain.

My Father obtained these cufflinks while working in fleet sales for Willys in the Caribbean and Central & South America in the 50’s and early 60’s.”

 
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Shriner Jeep Patrols

• CATEGORIES: Features, Old Images, Old News Articles

Here are a couple 1960s photos of the Shriner Mini Jeep Patrols. These jeep patrols and shiners in all kinds of mini-vehicles still ply the parade routes (This Facebook group includes modern photos and videos of them).

This first photo is from May 12, 1963, and published in the Marshall News Messenger (Marshall, Texas):

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This second photo was published in the Tyler Morning Telegraph (Tyler, Texas) on December 07, 1963:

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And here’s a 2007 video of them in action:

 
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1950s Photos of Shriners in WWII Jeeps

• CATEGORIES: Features, Old Images

This article shows a similarly painted WWII jeep, with a “Wrecking Crew” aboard, as the one below. The article is from the April 20, 1950, issue of the Daily Times out of Salisbury, Maryland:

1950-04-20-daily-times-salisbury-md-shirner-jeep

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Originally Published July 22, 2018:

“1966 Press Photo Shriners Ride in Jeep Parade 1960s Downtown Seattle Washington”

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Alaska Highway Movie from 1943

• CATEGORIES: Features, videos

This somewhat silly movie included numerous jeeps and other war-time transport. It looks like the Sierras were substituted for Northwestern Canada. Perhaps the funniest part of the movie begins at 21:36 as a jeep rolls up behind a guy in a parka (a scene that looks fake). For some reason, two soldiers have climbed a Matterhorn-looking spire. One guy starts to fall, so the other uses a rope with a loop to keep him from falling. Then, somehow, the guy up top then climbs down on the same rope, but how does the top of the rope connect to anything?

1943-alaska-highway-movie-poster

 
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Ex-Shriner’s Parade Mini-Jeep on eBay

• CATEGORIES: Features, Models, Other 4x4s

This Shriner’s jeep has a Willys MA look to it, though the seller presents no evidence that this was a Shriner’s jeep, it’s the right size for one.

View all the information on ebay

“Up for sale Shriner parade kart, go kart. This is a extremely rare Shriner kart. The only other one that I know of is in a museum in South Dakota. I be leave this Willys Jeep is from the early 1950s. The Jeep is mostly original with the exception of newer tires, rims, upholstery, paint, carpet, and engine. The engine has never had gas or oil in it. Everything appears to be in working order.”

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Woodedn Jeep Toy Coquitlam, B.C., Canada $300

• CATEGORIES: Features, Models, toys

Blaine spotted an unusual toy on Craigslist. Anyone recognize this wooden jeep? It seems to be missing the steering wheel and a windshield. It’s probably a one-off, but figured I’d check.

https://vancouver.craigslist.org/van/clt/d/port-coquitlam-wwii-jeep/7253553384.html

“Jeep from war 1940s ? – all wood – great collectible -”

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1948 Photo of MB/GPW at Cape Hattaras

• CATEGORIES: Features, Old Images

This photo was taken August 8, 1948, at the Cape Hatteras National Seashore. It was posted to the Cape Hatteras National Seashore Facebook page. According to the post, “On August 8, 1948 flags flew from the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse, as the United States Coast Guard celebrated the 158th anniversary of its founding. Governor R. Gregg Cherry flew in by helicopter and spoke at the celebration, which also included Coast Guard apparatus demonstrations and a mammoth fish fry.”

The jeep looks to be an MB or GPW with a custom top accented by sliding doors. It’s a pretty nice setup.

1948-08-08-jeep-custom-hardtop1 1948-08-08-jeep-custom-hardtop2

 
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A Few Jeep Stories from 1943

• CATEGORIES: Features, Old News Articles

This article demonstrates the hazards a jeep faced in the field. The article was published December 16, 1943, in the Kansas City Times by Kenneth L. Dixon.

Clipping from The Kansas City Times - Newspapers.com

 
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Image Comparing Rear Seats & DJ-3A Seats

• CATEGORIES: Features

I was nearly done assembling this post (a post I started when I spotted the useful seat comparison image below) when I discovered that Derek already has a pretty complete post (and frankly better than mine was going to be) on the topic of rear seats (and was the actual source of the seat comparison).

But, there were still a few unanswered questions I had after reading his page, so I deleted what I had and reframed it as shown below.

I realized:
1) I didn’t know if the DJ-3A used the CJ-5 rear seat, the CJ-3A/CJ-3B rear seat or something else?

2) And, did the Surrey have it’s own rear seat or the same as the DJ-3A? (My guess, based on the pics above, and Bruce’s pics below, is that the DJ-3As and Surreys used the 3A/3B seat)

Below are photos of Bruce Agan’s DJ-3A restored back seat:

dj3a-back-seat-bruce-agan1 dj3a-rear-seat-mounts-bruce-agan

While my DJ-3A came with a rear seat, it was actually one of the folding rear seats from an M-38 or M-38A1, a topic covered in these two links:

https://forums.g503.com/viewtopic.php?t=235427

http://willysmjeeps.com/v2/modules.php?name=Forums&file=viewtopic&t=10636

Here’s a pic of my 1956 DJ-3A with the rear seat that was in it. While no the correct seat, it fit in there pretty well:

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1963 Rural Wagon Brochure on eBay

• CATEGORIES: Advertising & Brochures, Features

This brochure out of Brazil highlights 6 reasons to buy the 1963 Rural wagon.

View all the information on eBay

“1963Jeep Folder, Brazilian Rural Jeep Folder. Condition is “Used”. Shipped with USPS First Class. This is a very nice folder Written in Portuguese Willys Overland”Fabricator vehicles of high quality”. I think what it’s saying is 6 positive reasons To buy a jeep in this rural area. Very nice piece, In great condition. All original.”

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Thank Goodness, 2020 is Over!

• CATEGORIES: Features

Happy New Year 2021!  Whew. We made it! Let’s hope 2021 is not the “Shit Show” 2020 was:

To no ones surprise, none of what I thought would happen, happened this past year. I could go through the long litany of what I had planned vs. what actually occurred, but I expect that’s true for all of us. Instead of tackling plans, we hunkered down, got two pups and stayed home. On the plus side, this did allow me to spend time better learning how to utilize our Traeger, as we had a freezer full of meat. I experimented with brining, smoked prickly pear (seems to reduce the stickyness) and chicken feet (for the dogs), played with chicken wing recipes, and cooked some amazing lamb/beef/pork/bison roasts. I also now have a pretty good workout gym in the garage, so I have returned to working out regularly, though, sadly, no gym means no basketball.

In July, Ann contracted the virus, and subsequently Covid, which hit her pretty hard, though thankfully didn’t seem to affect her lungs. She’s had various health issues since, similar to other ‘long haulers’; as of an ER visit in early December, one that required emergency dental surgery, her T-cell counts were still unusually low. Hopefully, she continues to improve.

For Ann and I, we expect 2021 to be a continuation of 2020, in that we begin the year with doctor appointments for our oldest dog, for Ann, and for Ann’s mother. That our oldest dog and Ann’s mother survived 2020 were minor miracles, but recent doc visits leave us doubting they will make it through 2021, so we will remain tied to home for the foreseeable future. Because of this, eWillys will continue as is (because I have plenty of short time bursts available, just not the long ones necessary to return to book writing).

My goals for the year are pretty modest, such as continuing to grow out my hair. I hope to get my hair to the point where I can donate it to a cancer patient as a wig. That means I have at least another year of growth. I’ve let my beard grow as well. Thankfully, Ann seems delighted by the whole process; she’s always up for an adventure.

I do have two short trips planned for 2021. Assuming the Homefront can survive without me, one trip will be a week-long adventure to Utah’s San Rafael Swell in late March to hike some remote trails with my oldest son. Sometime, probably in May, I’ll likely return to Salt Lake to help him build a shed for his backyard.

All that said, we did have some good fortune during 2020 and at some point late this year or into 2022 we will be buying a house or buying property and building a new place; that may require significant time away from updating the site and answering emails, Rest assured, there will be fair warning before that happens.

 

 
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August 1949 Toy Wagon Build From Mechanix Illustrated

• CATEGORIES: Features, Magazine, toys

The August 1949 issue of Mechanix Illustrated included detailed plans for constructing a battery powered, remote-control toy wagon.
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1946 Photo of Jeep and New T28 Tank on eBay

• CATEGORIES: Features, Old Images

I suppose the jeep is included in this press photo for size reference purposes?

View all the information on eBay

“1946 Press Photo T28 Army Tank and Military Jeep in Aberdeen, Maryland. This is an original press photo. 100-Ton Tank Unveiled by Army – Aberdeen, Maryland – Jeep is dwarfed by new superheavy T28 tank, one of the new Army weapons showed for the first time at the 28th annual meeting of the Army Ordnance Association before 6,000 industrialists. The tank, said to be the biggest vehicle ever built for the Army, weighs nearly 100-tons and carries a 105mm gun.Photo measures 7 x 10inches. Photo is dated 10-03-1946.”

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