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The Austin Gipsy (another British 4×4)

• CATEGORIES: Features

Expanding from the previous post about Austin Champs, and continuing our brief tour of british 4x4s, the Austin Gipsy was a chance for Austin Champ designers to start from scratch using what they had learned from the Champ.

One of the most interesting features was an independent suspension design as seen in the drawing to the right.

Austin Gipsy Links:

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1966 Video of the 14th Annual Jeep Jamboree

• CATEGORIES: Features, videos

This video demonstrates how many different types of vehicles were participating. At several points you’ll see a rare siting of an Austin Champ going offroad. Note also the nearly brand-new looking Tux Park. Great stuff!

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April 1: From Scottsdale AJs to Seligman Sundries

• CATEGORIES: Features • TAGS: .
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A piece of eWillys is now a part of Route 66 history at Seligman Sundries

We began our day by replenishing our food supplies. Unlike our trip to the East Coast last summer (we each gained ten pounds), we’ve been more careful about what we eat. This has meant many light dinners of good cheese, smoked meats and some crackers. Since Ann shouldn’t eat cows milk (beef protein sensitive since a baby), we’ve been shopping for goat and sheep cheese. Since AJs Fine Foods, Trader Joes, and Whole Foods are good sources of that cheese (and close together in Scottsdale), we decided we’d better stock up so we’d have dinner for the next few days.

After our shopping was done, we drove toward Mayer, AZ, where I’d learned about a place called Arcosanti. Below is an example photo of the place and more images here. I thought it warranted a closer look.

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I wanted to drop by Arcosonti, but we accidentally passed it.

For some reason, I thought this unusual development was outside Mayer, Arizona. It turns out it is near the intersection of I-17 and Hwy 69, which we’d already passed. So, we ended up touring Mayer for a short time before resuming our trek north to Route 66.

But, it wasn’t all for naught, as we did find this collection of odd vehicles just before Mayer. There’s a couple jeeps among some vintage trucks.

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A lineup of trucks overlooking the freeway.

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A wagon and a truck just to the left.

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An M-38A1.

We soon found ourselves in Chino Valley, where I spotted this collection of vehicles. Based on what I see I believe all five are Austin Champs, like the vehicles I bought and, fortunately, sold a few years ago. I just check Google Map’s satellite view, but had no luck as they don’t appear on it.

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Austin Champs in Chino Valley.

From Chino Valley, we drove north until we turned east on I-40. Soon we found a Route 66 exit and began to get our kicks on Route 66.

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A sign that greeted us as we exited Interstate 40.

Continue reading

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2 Dodge Command Cars Parlin, NJ **SOLD**

• CATEGORIES: Other 4x4s

UPDATE: **SOLD** Was $1700.

I always thought a Dodge Command Car would be a fun vehicle to own. I know nothing about them and they are probably as practical as Austin Champs, but they seem like they’d be fun projects.

“Offered for sale is a pair of WWII era dodge command cars…… I really do not know much about these things so I got a quick lesson and valuation from a local dodge guru…..

I am told both rigs are 1/2 ton 1941 wc-6’s.

The first rig is fairly complete with decent sheet metal and a frame with factory winch extensions on it. The motor turns over and most of the extraneous parts (fenders, windshield, winch, headlight buckets, etc.) are in the back of the bed. It has the original front seat frame. The dash on this truck has square gauge cutouts (the dodge guy told me this is an early dash but I cannot confirm that) and the data tag on the dash is intact.

The second rig is a rolling chassis (non-winch type) with a transfer case in it. This was intended as a donor rig for the first truck and the body is separated into panel sections and stacked on the frame.
The dash on this rig has round gauge cutouts.

These originally belonged to an older gentleman who had begun work on the first rig using the second as a donor. He passed several years ago and they sat until I ended up with them…..

There are no titles for these rigs — they will come with a notarized bill of sale only………

If anyone has any questions or would like to come look at them in person, please email me………The vehicles are located in Parlin, NJ……..

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National Guard Militia Museum of New Jersey

• CATEGORIES: Airborne Lightweight Jeeps, Museums • TAGS: , .

I’ve decided to create a new category that tracks the early jeeps located in museums.

Bill Maloney has shot a variety of early jeeps, among other vehicles, that appear in eastern US Museums.  Below are some of the images he has taken at the Militia Museum of New Jersey, in Sea Girt, NJ.  One of the more unique vehicles is the Prototype Extra Light Air Drop (see other lightweight jeeps here). Bill doesn’t provide any info about this particular light weight jeep, however Mark Askew, in his book RARE WW2 JEEP, identifies the vehicle below as a later version of a light weight jeep made my chevrolet.  There is an earlier version of this vehicle that had, at the very least, a slightly different grill and different lights.

Click here to see all of Bill’s 4×4 pics.

Here’s an extended MB Transport Willys (Ok, I don’t really know what the official name for this is).  I assumed these were built special for the Coast Guard?

This is a pilot version of the CJ-2A.  Note the location of the spare tire.

Here is an example of Bantam’s BRC-40.

This is a pic of the Austin Champ: