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The Package Delivery Van Starts its Journey

• CATEGORIES: Features • TAGS: This site contains affiliate links for which I may be compensated.

You might remember that we spotted this rare 1948 Willys Overland Package Delivery van a while back.  The buyer decided he had to let it go, so Jesse volunteered to take on the project of restoring it.   To get to Phoenix, the van has made its first stop in Missouri at Craig’s place.

Craig writes, “The 1948 Willys Overland Urban Package Delivery is 430 miles closer to it’s new home in Phoenix, Arizona.  It’s resting at my place in Defiance, Missouri right now before I make the pilgrimage out there to Phoenix and back in a few weeks.  Since the ’48 got its start on eWillys I thought it could use an update there as well.  The pictures were taken just a stones throw south of Roxanna, Ohio where Roger Martin (pictured with me) brought it from its home in Lake Geneva, Ohio.  It looks a little better with some rubber on the wheels! Craig @ thefcconnection

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FC Ad from Canada eBay

• CATEGORIES: Advertising & Brochures, FC150-FC170-M677 This site contains affiliate links for which I may be compensated.

UPDATE:  Check out the Spanish version of this over at the FCCONNECTION.

Glen forwarded this Ad from eBay.

“ORIGINAL 1961 JEEP WILLYS TRUCK CANADA 4 WHEEL DRIVE CAR AD 103 IN WHEELBASE. Ad measures 13.75″ x 10″ approximately. Ad is in very good condition.”

http://www.ebay.com/itm/1961-JEEP-WILLYS-TRUCK-CANADA-4-WHEEL-DRIVE-CAR-AD-103-WHEELBASE-/180770426473?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_2&hash=item2a16c1ce69

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What about the FC-160?

• CATEGORIES: FC150-FC170-M677, Features This site contains affiliate links for which I may be compensated.

I had to update this page because my links I had used no longer work.  Fortunately, I found an image of a FC-160 from India (at least the Flickr page claims it is a FC-160 — feel free to correct me on this).  This picture was taken in January of this year by Vaibhav Bhosale.

“In 1965 Mahindra & Mahindra of India began assembling the Jeep FC Forward Control. Mahindra introduced its versions to include the FC-160. The FC-160 (and later FJ-160) uses a frame which is 2.33 meters in length. The FC-150s frame was 2.05 meters while the FC-170 used a frame of 2.63 meters in length. Thus, the FC-160 was an intermediate truck, marketed to supplement the FC line and the final version was only manufactured by Mahindra & Mahindra.

The pick-up box was designed and manufactured by Mahindra and there were other bodies which were available. Additionally, the base FC-160 chassis was used in the manufacture of a mini-bus which uses the basic front face of the FC. Currently, Mahindra’s FJ-460 and FJ-470 van or mini-bus vehicles still retain the appearance of the original Forward Control. These vehicles can accomodate from 11 to 15 passengers plus the driver”

 

Caption from flickr: One of the three Jeep models built by Mahindra & Mahindra. This vehicle was used by my school to train the students on Automobile subject. We used to play hide n seek when it got abandoned.

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NIssan Patrol 4W60

• CATEGORIES: Features, International, News This site contains affiliate links for which I may be compensated.

Roberto wrote to me asking if I knew of any manuals or other information for the restoration of a Datsun/Nissan 4W60 for a friend that is considering restoring one  (if anyone knows of a manual, please let me know).  Well, I didn’t even know the 4W60 existed.  So, I started researching. Here are several models that followed the 4W60.

According to this site, Nissan, Toyota and Mitsubishi all submitted prototypes to the Japanese government in 1950 to win the rights to produce government 4wd vehicles. Mitsubishi would win, but Nissan and Toyota continued to develop 4wd vehicles anyway.

The Nissan Prototype submitted for consideration looked like this:

For the first production run starting in 1951, however, Nissan went with a very MB-like design.  I tried to find restored examples of these, but had no luck.

The second version of the 4W60 had a few changes. I found this image on a Russian auto website, but misplaced the link.

Here’s a brochure from the Rocky Mountain Patrol and Offroad Website

The would also make a Wagon (4W60 wagon) and a Truck (4w70 Truck).

Here are some useful links:

http://www.rmp-o.com/literature/pages/4W60%20brochure%20002.htm

http://www.rmp-o.com/literature/index.htm

http://www.earlydatsun.com/nissan4w60.html

http://www.patrol4x4.com/forum/members-nissan-patrols-19/rays-restored-1958-4w65-patrol-20479/

http://offroadsz.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=17&t=1483

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The DJ-3A vs the DJ-3A Gala vs the DJ-3A Surrey

• CATEGORIES: DJ-3A, Features, videos, Women & Jeeps • TAGS: , This site contains affiliate links for which I may be compensated.

UPDATE:  Bruce let me know that there were three different windshields sported by the DJ-3A:

1. The typical 3A type with the vent that opens up;

2. It also came with what is referred to as the 3B WS frame. That green jeep (see below) probably has it’s original WS frame;

3. The 3rd style is the ventilating WS frame that is similar to the 2a frame in
that the glass tilts outward. This 3rd type is very rare and I have only
seen one DJ with the 3rd style

OVERVIEW

I’ve been meaning to write this history of sorts about the DJ-3A ever since I received this information from Bruce last October.  Many thanks to Bruce for his tireless effort to understand the DJ-3A and his desire to share this information with the world-at-large.

I would still not consider this post finished, as I’m sure a few of you have some interesting details to add or correct.

THE GOAL:

My goal here is to take Bruce’s information and organize it in a way to make sense of this strange thing called the DJ-3A Dispatcher Gala Surrey Not-quite-a-CJ-3A colorful Jeep.   I want to differentiate between these three models — DJ-3A/DJ-3A dispatcher, DJ-3A Gala, and the DJ-3A Surrey — so that I can better evaluate these vehicles when I run across them for sale.

So, let’s begin:

One of the more confusing series of jeeps I’ve encountered are the DJ-3A, the DJ-3A Gala and the DJ-3A Surrey. However, thanks to both information from Bruce (who also supplied Derek Redmond with much of the DJ-3A Gala Surrey information and pics on the CJ-3B Page) and an article in the December 2009 issue of Vintage Truck Magazine, I *think* I have a much better feel for this topic.

Importantly, and for clarification, based on all the research I have reviewed, there appears to be no such thing as a DJ-3A Gala Surrey (and I’m as responsible as anyone for describing them that way).  The literature I have received from Bruce refers to either a DJ-3A Gala or a DJ-3A Surrey.  The Gala’s were promoted as Gala’s at the international resorts and Hawaii (which became a state in 1959, which might explain why this was being handled like an international sale).

THE DJ-3A & DJ-3A DISPATCHER:
The DJ-3A was introduced in 1955. It used the body style of the older CJ-3A, along with the L-134 engine. Unlike the CJ-3A, it came with either a column shift or top loader three-speed T-96 manual transmission. It was offered with many different body options including a soft top, hard top, or even a full van body.  Some of these body options made changes to the body necessary, including some that had no tailgates so the spare tire could mount in the rear.

Others, like the DJ-3A Dispatchers, had differently shaped passenger and driver sides to allow easy entry & exit of the vehicle (I assume those were the reasons).  With all these different body options, it is no wonder many of us, and yours truly as well, were confused about what constitutes a DJ-3A.

Thus far, everything I’ve learned suggests that there were no 4wd DJ-3A’s produced.  So, if you encounter a 4wd DJ-3A, it’s been modified.

Probably, the most distinctive, unique, and consistent body attribute of a DJ-3A is the large speedometer, similar to the CJ-5 and the post-1955 CJ-3B speedometers.  It was the only ‘low hood’ flat fender produced with the large speedometer.

EXAMPLES:

Below is a Convertible DJ-3A.  You can see the lack of 4wd in the front.  Click on the picture to see more pictures.  Though I thought the below windshield was from a CJ-3B, Bruce provided a correction to that statement.  He says some DJ-3As came with a 3B SW Frame, and he believes that’s what we are looking at in this pic.

Here’s an example from Chris of a DJ-3A without a tailgate.


Here’s a DJ-3A Dispatcher example (note cutout sides) with a tail gate:

And here’s another nice dispatcher with a top:

THE DJ-3A GALA:

In early 1959, the DJ-3A Gala was introduced and marketed to vacation locations in an attempt to offer rentable transportation solutions for vacationers visiting resorts.  According to the article below, the idea was the brain child of the Las Brisas Resort in Acapulco, Mexico, which painted a few jeeps pink and offered them to consumers.  Louis Yocich, a Willys dealer, spotted them and brought the idea back to the factory.  To this day, the Las Brisas resort and hotel still refers to itself as a ‘Pink and White Paradise” (see quality control comment).

MUCH MUCH More information.  This post was simply too big to put on the front page:

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