Features Research Archives

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NIssan Patrol 4W60

• CATEGORIES: Features, International, News

Roberto wrote to me asking if I knew of any manuals or other information for the restoration of a Datsun/Nissan 4W60 for a friend that is considering restoring one  (if anyone knows of a manual, please let me know).  Well, I didn’t even know the 4W60 existed.  So, I started researching. Here are several models that followed the 4W60.

According to this site, Nissan, Toyota and Mitsubishi all submitted prototypes to the Japanese government in 1950 to win the rights to produce government 4wd vehicles. Mitsubishi would win, but Nissan and Toyota continued to develop 4wd vehicles anyway.

The Nissan Prototype submitted for consideration looked like this:

For the first production run starting in 1951, however, Nissan went with a very MB-like design.  I tried to find restored examples of these, but had no luck.

The second version of the 4W60 had a few changes. I found this image on a Russian auto website, but misplaced the link.

Here’s a brochure from the Rocky Mountain Patrol and Offroad Website

The would also make a Wagon (4W60 wagon) and a Truck (4w70 Truck).

Here are some useful links:

http://www.rmp-o.com/literature/pages/4W60%20brochure%20002.htm

http://www.rmp-o.com/literature/index.htm

http://www.earlydatsun.com/nissan4w60.html

http://www.patrol4x4.com/forum/members-nissan-patrols-19/rays-restored-1958-4w65-patrol-20479/

http://offroadsz.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=17&t=1483

 
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The Newlywed’s Willys Version 1.0

• CATEGORIES: Builds, Features

Back in January of 2010, Dan contacted me saying he and his fiancee wanted to trade their Willys wagon for a flattie (wagon is to the left).  After patiently waiting four months, they finally found someone to make the trade.  Their goal was to do a low budget build with more modern running gear.  Even more ambitiously, they wanted to complete the project by the end of summer. Here is their story of creating version 1.  There is plenty of additional work left, but it runs and drives well, so congrats to the newlyweds (may you have many more great adventures together)! And, let me know when the second iteration is complete 🙂

Dan also notes he still has the complete 1946 Willys chassis and drivetrain available for sale if anybody wants it.  (He’s in central Idaho).

Dan writes, “My fiancée (at the time) and i decided to get ourselves a Willys since both of us had always wanted one ever since we were little…

We thought that we would spend our weekends working on it in the months preceding our wedding and then use it as our getaway car for the ceremony (I even suggested a 4×4 trail out into the hills for the wedding but that was pushing it a little bit too far 🙂
We found our specimen (see below)  on eWillys and traded our ’62 wagon for it. *sniff sniff*

The motor was shot, but that didn’t bother me as i was planning on putting a toyota chassis and running gear under it.  The original plan was to put all of our time into the chassis and suspension and engine to make it SOLID and drivable. Then, later, restore the body at our leisure. However, once i started stripping down the body it became apparent that the body wouldn’t hold together without immediate work; the floors had galvanized metal screwed over them to give them an appearance of -something- but underneath was just rust held together by an occasional shred of metal. So, diamond plate and 18g metal were quickly purchased to make new floorpans with and the welding and grinding started.

For 2 months of weekends all we did was cut, grind, weld, grind and assemble (see pics). As we wanted to keep the budget tight, we gathered a variety of parts, including:

1965 toyota 4runner chassis
1983 toyota pickup axles
Completely rebuilt 22r motor
1987 5sp tranny/t-case
Rear driveshaft shorted to 11″
Front driveshaft lenghtened aprox 14″
Bought an m38 arctic top from an ewillys user over the hill in montana

We were pushing the limits trying to get it done in time for our wedding in august of 2010, but then a week before our wedding K got in a serious car accident and all work on the Willys stopped (of course) as we attended to her broken bones.

We still got married the next week -her with her jaw wired shut and on pain meds but, sadly, the Willys wasn’t able to attend the wedding. The following months we focussed our energies on work ($$) and working on our house. After Christmas passed I again had some free time available and set about finishing the project which was mostly connecting the new engine, building a clutch/brake pedal assembly and creating a wiring harness.

Finally, after many long weekends, last week she ran! We took a weekend trip up to see the in-laws in it the very next day. Other than a clogged fuel filter (old tank) and the brakes being sticky from disuse, he did awesome! The power steering is nice; K says that he’s even easier for her to drive than my toyota pickup.

Today i built a rear bumper for him and put in some better (hopefully) seats. There is still much to do like a complete front bumper, custom fuel tank (today i spied an air-compressor tank that looks like it might be perfect to modify and bolt underneath the back end.) and create a new tailgate.  Sometime this summer we hope to get around to doing some body work but for now maybe we can just try our different colors with rattle cans to see what we like (hey, we could have a different color every week!)

Can’t wait ’til the warm weather comes and we can take off the hardtop!

 
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Want to Ditch that Mechanical Speedometer?

• CATEGORIES: Features, How To, Tips & Tricks • TAGS: .

UPDATE: Paul forwarded a pic of the parts for the speedometer:

I’ve included a pic of Paul’s topside dash as an illustration of Paul’s dilemma/solution. You can read all of Paul’s adventures here.

inside2

Paul writes, “I recently hit a bit of a snag with the speedometer sending unit and I thought other Willys modifiers might be interested in the problem and solution.  Since I repositioned the instrument panel above the windshield (the hard top will not be removed and the windshield is not a folding unit) I realized there would be a problem with the mechanical speedometer.

The speedometer drive cable would have to have many tight bends as it snaked it’s way from the rear of the speedometer, down the windshield post, behind the dash and under the body where it would screw into the drive unit on the transfercase.  Taking into account the numerous tight bends, the length of the drive cable and the space necessary for the drive cable routing I figured it would be much easier to use an electric speedometer.  This way I’d only have to string some wires from the speedometer to the sending unit (a hall effect device) attached to the drive gear in the transfercase.

Really rather simple but I discovered the original Willys speedo drive unit was made for a flanged drive cable and the electrical sending unit was made for a square drive cable.  The stub cable supplied with the electrical sending unit is only two inches long but both ends are square so this wouldn’t work with the original shaft in the transfercase.

A friend of mine suggested I talk with the local marine diesel parts guys because he remembered the Detroit diesel engines used similar adapters as tach drives and they might have something which would work.  Less than five minutes after I explained my adapter problem and showed the items I wanted to connect, Jim (the parts guy) found a two inch long flex shaft with a square drive on one end and a round, flanged end on the other.  Not only was this the exact part I needed, the right length, and the right ends, but it was also the right price …FREE!

I realize most of the eWillys folks are keeping their Jeeps closer to stock when it comes to the instrument location, but it’s something to keep in mind if you do decide to go with an electrical speedometer.  Jim sure saved me hours of work since I won’t have to build what I need; I believe a few dozen donuts delivered early in the morning are necessary as a special thanks.  THANKS JIM !!!”

 
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Puffer Engineering

• CATEGORIES: Advertising & Brochures, Features, Willys Wagons • TAGS: .

You can easily turn your CJ-2A into a Wagon!  Just follow the easy turn-my-cj2a-into-a-station-wagon-kit from Puffer Engineering. I spotted this image via a British site that linked me to oldcarandtruckpictures.com. Strangely, when I go to oldcarandtruckpictures.com’s jeep area, I can’t locate the image.  The web works in mysterious ways!

I tried to learn more about the manufacturer, but searches on ‘Puffer Engineering’ revealed nothing, to me anyway, other than this image.

 
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Jean Luc & Toot Sweet

• CATEGORIES: Artists/Drawings, Features, Reader Stories

As a five year old in 1944 Belgium, you can only imagine that Jean Luc’s experience with soliders, jeeps and planes left a indelible landmark upon his imagination.  During his life as a successful illustrator, you can see him revisit that landmark many times over in his drawings.  You can read a brief biography of Jean Luc here (click on the biography link) and view some of his amazing work.

Below is an image of Jean Luc’s 2010 Christmas Card.  It features an image of him as a boy leaning up against ‘Toot Sweet”, his 1942 GPW which he still drives around the L.A. Area.  Recently, Jean Luc got a taste of how few old jeeps are seen by kids these days.  He was “driving my GPW the other day and some teenagers asked me if I built that “contraption” myself . . .”  As he noted, “Not very encouraging but we can not blame them.”

Now ‘retired’, Jean Luc is working on a graphic novel about G.I.s, Jeeps and Piper Cubs in Paris in 1944-45.  Below is an example of his drawing talent.  Thanks for sharing!

 
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When Good Engines Go Bad

• CATEGORIES: Features, videos

HOG forward this video and link to Bang Shift of an engine exploding in the Netherlands.  In the comments section, a commenter had some additional explosions.  So, here are a few of the videos from youtube (there are others).

2 explosions to the same tractor in 2008 and 2009

 
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Roberts Armory Traveling Museum Rochelle, Il

• CATEGORIES: Features, Museums • TAGS: .

Roberts Armory is a traveling museum located in Rochelle, Illinois.

According to their website, the museum “specializes in the acquisition and display of light armored vehicles and artillery used by the U.S. Army in World War II. During World War II reenactments the museum usually portrays the 70th Tank Battalion. The museum participates in WWII related displays, parades, motion pictures and reenactments throughout the United States.”

Roberts Armory has also been asked to participate in movies and shows.  Though Roberts appears to have a facility, unlike traditional museums, Roberts is only open for visitation on special days or by special appointment.

While Roberts only appears to have one 1945 MB, they do have a few different outfits for it.

1. Here it is with and without a top.

2.  Here it is with the 50 Cal gun mounted.

3.  Here it is in full armor.

 
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1941? Oddity Captain Cook, Hi **STATUS UNKNOWN**

• CATEGORIES: Features, Unusual • TAGS: .

UPDATE:  This was for sale for $1000.  Status currently unknown.

This is precious … More pics, I want more pics!  These two were listed the next day (& just down the road from Captain Cook, Hi, too).

“4 Wheel Drive; All Original; Haul Away; Complete Classic”

 
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Multiple Older Jeeps for sale Minnetonka, Mn

• CATEGORIES: CJ-6, Features, M-38, Willys Trucks, Willys Wagons • TAGS: , .

UPDATE:  These are nice and have been available for a while.

I admit a little confusion.  On the one hand there are many available, but on the other hand he is selling only one or two?

“1956 panel van,1959 CJ6,1960CJ5 all are originals,low miles,paint,interiors,motors, ect. Call for more details or find them listed craigslist minneapolis. Phone calls only Paul 952-472-1046 Please leave message if no answer,let ring at least 8 times”

http://houston.craigslist.org/cto/2210326268.html

 
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Drag Jeeps

• CATEGORIES: Features, Racing • TAGS: .

UPDATE: An update on Rapid Transit

Jeff and I were exchanging emails about drag jeeps the other day.  We were both sharing our memories about Roger Monson’s drag jeep, Rapid Transit. As Jeff notes, it certainly had its own sound!

Jeff wrote “it had an actual belt driven blown 4cyl pontiac motor in it.  A small 471 blower, insane RPMs and crazy loud! If ya didn’t cover your ears when it came by it HURT.  I saw it run @ the old firemountain drag strip @ washougal in the mid 1980s”

I’ve included a pic of it below.  Wes has collected a variety of old school Sand Drag vehicles at offroadracecanada.  Check it out!

 
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Builds: David’s ‘New’ Wagon

• CATEGORIES: Builds, Features

David wrote to me today to tell me about his first wagon project.  He got a great deal on it, especially for an eastern wagon, and has a restoration plan in place.

He writes, “My rough plan is sort of a rolling resto on a budget at first. Specifically, get motor running first…then brakes. Next will be things that need to be done for safe driving (signals, lights, windows fixed, emergency brake etc.).

After that I’d like to sand/blast to metal the worst of the unprotected areas (hood, roof paint pretty much gone) and epoxy paint and primer them, then gradually work on other issues. But first things first, have to get running and driveable cuz the wife is not gonna be very tolerant of it taking space in the garage if I can’t move it easily, lol.

On down the road I’d like to do a frame off. I’m not one of those chop em up and put a v-8 in it kinda guys, but not opposed to some mods like a brake upgrade or electric wipers to improve driveability. My overall goal of restoration will be to keep it as original as possible but I plan to use and drive it, not restore to mint or show condition (but who knows what the future will hold? I don’t plan to change anything that couldn’t be changed back to 100% original easily)”

Best of luck David!

 
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Hubert’s Must-See Jeep Family Site

• CATEGORIES: Artists/Drawings, Features, Website

Craig dropped me a note today about an old friend of his.

Craig writes, “I was doing a little web surfing and found an old lost friend, Hubert Cossard.  I had been in contact with Hubert some 9 years ago about some awesome drawings he had made of Forward Control Jeeps.  There were definite communication barriers back then as I am a little behind on foreign languages (even known to destroy my own language a bit!) [ed note: you aren’t alone!] but was in total awe of Hubert’s detailed drawings.  Like many internet sites, there one day and gone the next,  Hubert’s site disappeared.

Though I lost contact with Hubert years ago, by accident I just found his new, greatly expanded site.  On the Jeep Family link there are drawings of just about every Jeep ever built or thought of.  It’s a gotta-check-out-site!”

One quick trip to the site and I can only second Craigs description of the drawings.  I couldn’t say for sure if they are scale-exact drawings, but they sure have the detail of someone who knows their jeeps.  The site is in French, so if you need to translate anything, you might try Google Translate.

Here is an example of Hubert’s work below.  Check out all of them here.

 
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Devon’s Power Steering Setup

• CATEGORIES: Features, How To

Greg asked for a few pics of the Steering combination on the Eller’s Jeeps, so Randy climbed under Devon’s Jeep to snap a few for us. Thanks Randy!

Here is Randy’s description, ”

I took a few pictures of the Saginaw steering setup in Devon’s MB but they were mostly taken from below because of his winch plate covering the top.  It is a little unclear just how it all works without the top view.

Dusty will be bringing his CJ2A back up here in a few weeks and I think it will be easier to get good pictures from his Jeep.  It still has the stock column in it which is what Greg is interested in.  I might have a spare steering box mount to take pictures of as well.

Picture 1 was taken from the driver’s side tire.  The frame was plated on the inside with ½ inch steel and protrudes an inch or so below the frame rail.  The outside plate is 3/8 and is what the spring mounts are also welded onto (the Scout II axles require outboard spring mounts).  3 of the 4 steering box mount bolt heads are visible; the 4th bolt was welded inside the frame rail because I wasn’t certain if it would interfere with the spring mount if it passed all of the way through.  The 2 bottom bolts from the steering box mount to the steering box are also visible; the 3rd bolt is visible in picture 005 on the top-front of the steering box.

Picture 2 shows how the steering box mount lowers the steering gear and in conjunction with the drop pitman arm almost eliminates bump steer even though this Jeep has probably 7 or 8 inches of lift.

The long bolt that protrudes down through the frame rail is one of the winch plate bolts and the other one you can see in Picture 3 ties the bumper and spring mount together.  It is a pretty sturdy assembly with the plated frame rails, spring mounts, steering box mount, winch plate and bumper all tied together.  The frame horns had to be cut off to plate the frame rails; the passenger side frame rail was also plated inside and out.  This mount allows the steering arm to pass underneath the stock round crossmember and it works well with aftermarket motor mounts.”

 
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The Story of the Bantam BRC … A Movie?

• CATEGORIES: Features

UPDATE: Paul Bruno (aka the History Czar) provided a nice response to this post about his movie effort.  Please check it out.

Some of you might remember the video I posted back in 2009 of the recreated, original BRC (if you haven’t, check it out here).  It seems that the Bantam and its owner, Duncan Rolls, have been touring a bit, landing in an interview with the History Czar in August of 2010 (both the History Czar, seated, and Duncan are pictured below from Nov 2010).

In December of 2010, the Czar blogs about “his and his wife’s 11 year odyssey, along with Max Freedman these past 5 years, to have a feature film made about the creation of the first Jeep, the Bantam Reconnaissance Car (BRC),  in Butler, PA USA during the summer of 1940.”  So, the Czar seems to have a real passion for the Jeep story.

You can go here to check out their facebook page and follow their journey to make a movie:  http://www.facebook.com/pages/manage/?act=39829251#!/pages/The-Jeep-An-American-Triumph/110738008090

Read more about the premise and synopsis here.

I read through the premise and synopsis.  Personally, I’d take a little different tack with the story.  I would place the true story of the original jeep as the background for telling another, fictional story about some type of relationship (love story like the Titanic, father/son, coming of age, etc).

I’ve thought a lot about this because I too have wondered about developing a jeep themed movie, though it would be about the heyday of jeeping/trail riding/clubs/racing of the 70s.

A good example of how such a story, like the Bantam story, doesn’t work as a stand-alone story line can be seen in the Tucker movie.  While I enjoyed the movie, because it was a story about the struggle to make a cool car, most people weren’t all that compelled to go see it, because of the same reason — it was only about the struggle to make this cool car.

That’s just my 2 cents, which might not even be worth that much.

 
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Hard to Find NOS Willys Parts out of Alaska

• CATEGORIES: Features

Paul writes, “Many years ago I went thru the front and rear axles on my Willys, changed the ring and pinion gears from 5.38s to 4.27s, replaced all bearings, seals and races with new before repainting the housings and attaching new springs.  For some reason the steering knuckle seals came loose from the metal attach covers so today I went to the local military surplus yard (E. A. Patson Parts and Equipment 907 333-5682) in search of new replacement parts.  I was able to purchase new old stock knuckle seals, differential cover gaskets and the speedometer drive gear for what I felt was a very reasonable cost.

Both the buildings, land and the surplus parts are all for sale so this fantastic source of old Jeep parts is going to go away soon.  I just thought I’d mention that all these old military vehicle parts are for sale, they have lots of parts for some types and some parts for lots of other types.

So, if anyone out there reading EWILLYS is looking for a hard to find part they might want to give Rod a call.  He’s pretty sharp on the old stuff and he understands the idea of repair instead of replace.

I’ve attached a photo of the knuckle seal packaging (unopened) with the packing date from Willys Overland Motors.  I think it’s pretty neat.”

 
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WWII Jeep Art from Cranston Fine Arts

• CATEGORIES: Artists/Drawings, Features • TAGS: .

SAS artwork from Cranston Fine Arts in the UK. I’m unsure if any prints of the below works are still available.

 
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Identifying A Strange Looking Engine Block

• CATEGORIES: Engine, Features, How To

Brian wrote me asking if I knew what type of engine this was.  He pulled it out of a old WWII Jeep and didn’t recognize it.  He wrote that the Head cast was #634816 and the block casting#630282. In particular, he noted the exposed cylinder tubes.

I told him I didn’t know what it was, and confessed that I had never worked with any MB/GPW motors, but I would do my best to figure it out (I do enjoy a good internet hunt). After searching through various images I could see it was similar to a MB and GPW motor, but was also different.

For example, you can see examples of GPW heads here at Dino’s site and though it looks similar, it’s missing various features.  Here is an example of MB block.  In fact, if you go here, you can review all kinds of WWII engines.

After trying various keyword images searches, I tried typing in the casting numbers and that is when I discovered that the head was a pre war head from a Willys Model 37. So, then I looked at prewar Willys.  On this page http://clubs.hemmings.com/clubsites/wocv/willywilly/willywilly.htm on the fourth pic down, you can just make out, just below the distributor, similar indentations on a 1938 Willys.  Here is a better look at a prewar block.

 
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Bill Shares a Great Old Pic

• CATEGORIES: Features, Old Images

Bill bought this original photograph a decade or more ago.  It depicts what appears to be a Ford GP. I’m kind of wondering if this photo was of a civilian, as that looks like a license plate on the front?  Bill, can you make out that plate on the grille from the original photo?

Bill writes, “On the front (of the image) is a great pic of a soldier, obviously proud of a Jeep he is driving.   The best part is the note he wrote in pencil on the back of the photo to his family or friends back home….   it reads:   “This is what is called a jeep.   It will seat 4 men & go like hell

Thanks for sharing Bill!

 
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Paul Re-plates His Plates

• CATEGORIES: Features, How To • TAGS: .

Paul continues to make progress on his build, though he does have a habit of becoming side-tracked with wood projects (if I am a Foodie,  he is a Woodie).

Paul writes, “The local exotic wood store has been letting me pick over the wood shipments right after they’re unloaded and this has caused some trouble with overheating my credit card.  While I’m still making progress on the never ending Willys project, money has been in short supply so many of these projects have to be low buck items.  One of the cheaper but necessary jobs was to repaint the brass data plates (a total of six plates) originally installed on the M 38.  While I really wasn’t looking forward to working on these plates ( lots of trouble for very little progress) I felt the appearance of the Willys would be improved by having bright and shiny data plates installed on the heater duct below the base of the windshield.

I use a really strong liquid paint stripper to remove the original black paint from the data plates. After the paint is gone I do a chemical wipe with lacquer thinner then gently rub the bare brass with a fine grade scotch pad before doing another chemical wipe followed by the spray can black. Cheap, easy, and quite time consuming but the finished plate looks pretty good.

While it isn’t difficult to redo these data plates it is real easy to screw up the paint (once the new paint is applied) while cleaning off the lettering and then have to start all over again.  I’m using rattle can glossy black spray paint to apply two light coats on each plate and I let them dry for one day after the second coat.  After the paint is dry I very carefully block sand the plate with 400 grit sandpaper with the plate supported on a thick, flat surface.  I’m using a 3/4 inch thick slab of granite (it’s flat and cheap) so if I didn’t damage the paint during the sanding process I spray a very light coat of clear over the data plate and let it dry for another day.  Don’t spray a heavy coat of clear, it lifts the black paint which results in more clean up time and then you have to start all over.  I figured this out the hard way so you wouldn’t have too.  Geeze, what a guy!

Anyway, if things went well you should have a new appearing data plate to attach to your Willys.  I’m still working on the remaining four plates because I got a little careless while sanding  but the first two plates look pretty good.  I’ve attached three pictures showing the stages of data plate repainting.

1. Cleaned Plates with paint removed.

2. After paint is applied.

3. After paint is lightly sanded off.

 
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Jeep Rod Sacramento, CA **SCAM**

• CATEGORIES: Features, Jeep Rods • TAGS: .

UPDATE 2:  This is a scam … one of the stranger scams I’ve seen.  I flagged the craigslist ad as spam.

UPDATE:  I posted this in October of 2010 when Freestyle Magazine’s blog captured this unusual jeep rod.

“Rebuilt Chevy 327 V8
Lowered on Enkei Muscle Car Springs & Shocks
New Off-Road/Snow Tires
Chop Top
Documented Military History
Transmission Will Not Shift Past 2nd (C4 Corvette 4 Speed
Radiator Leaks
No Stereo, No AC, No Heater, NOTHING
Speedometer Doesnt Work, but not a problem because of the transmission.  will trade for a tuned import, bagged truck or another rat rod or pre-smog muscle car”

 
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More SAS Photos

• CATEGORIES: Features, Old Images • TAGS: .

I found these SAS photos while searching for something else today.  You can see several SAS related posts here.

On these first two pics, note the strange louvres on the grilles.  I don’t remember these from other pics.  You can see the first photo at this site.

Here is a german website showing SAS Jeeps in Europe.  There are a few more photos there, too.

From another page at the same site comes these two photos. More photos here also.

From the WW2 Airsoft Website come these two photos.  There are a few more there, too.

And this image from Belgium comes from this site which has duplicates of images above and more.

 
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Signed SAS Print

• CATEGORIES: Artists/Drawings, Features • TAGS: .

I thought this was kind of cool, too.  The photo comes from a collectibles site. The people featured in the 8″x6″ print are Paddy Mayne and Ian Fenwick.

 
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1946 CJ-2A Boyer Fire Jeep Oro Station, Ont, CA **SOLD**

• CATEGORIES: CJ-2A, Features, Fire/Police/Industry Vehicles • TAGS: , .

UPDATE:  **SOLD** Was on eBay.

(01/29/2011) Starting bid is $12k.  It looks well maintained, but dusty.

“Up for auction is an original WILLYS 1946 CJ2A BOYER FIRE JEEP.

It is extremely hard to find an original Boyer jeep with that many accessories still on the vehicle. To find out more about Boyer jeeps please go to http://cj3b.info/Fire/fireindex.html.

The jeep is in orginal condition. It appears it has been painted once. The engine runs nice and smooth, all driveline works. Engine has original governor. The mileage on the vehicle shows 2304 miles however the speedometer appears to be broken. Jeep has some rust issues: front floor especially under the tool box (rusted through), on back corner behind reflectors (both corners rusted through), otherwise the outside body, fenders, etc. are in excellent condition especially the windshield frame (have never seen one in that great shape for a 1946 vehicle!).

The jeep comes with all the accessories you see in the pictures. Unfortunately it didn’t come with the pump. It appears that the pump was removed many years ago. The jeep was stored inside for many years, we changed the fueltank and the exhaust system as we didn’t want to take a chance with the old one with old fuel in it. The old fuel tank is emptied and is included in the auction. It appears there were no leaks from the old fueltank. Most likely it will need to be boiled out.

The brakes need to be looked after as the brake pedal goes straight down to the floor however it moves freely.

We have a professional restoration facility for Willys Jeeps and in our opinion this would be a simple restoration because everything is there to do nice job. Fuellines, brakelines, wiring harness all original.

This vehicle comes without any warranties or guaranties. We have over 15 years of experience in shipping vehicles worldwide and will assist buyer with shipping/loading and paperwork.

Shipping, taxes and/or other fees (import, customs, etc.) are not included in the auction and are the buyers responsibility.”

 

 
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Anyone Recognize This? **MYSTERY SOLVED**

• CATEGORIES: Features

UPDATE: See Comments.  This is an old style parking assist for a trailer. See Comments.

Dexter found another MB deal, but this item was installed on the steering column.  Anyone know what it is?  It looks to be a hydraulic unit, but not sure why it says “not for parking”?

 
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Agent CJ-3B

• CATEGORIES: Features, videos

Now that Chet has finished his CJ-3B restoration, it seems he now has time to launch his movie career!  He hadn’t planned on creating an ‘agent theme’, that emerged during editing.

Chet writes, “I made a “hokey” you tube clip last week and used the term “biscuit fender” that I learned about 10 years ago on the 3B forum…. Also in the intro I used the term “Horse Face”, as this is an affectionate way the people of Brazil refer to their 3B’s.”