Magazine Research Archives

Jeeps filled magazines in various ways. Some magazines reported on brand new ‘Blitz Buggy’ and other important develops about the jeep during WWII. Others reported on the changing models during its civilian life. Still others showcased how jeeps were used and the modifications done to them.

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1946 Fortune Article on Willys-Overland

• CATEGORIES: Features, Magazine

UPDATE: This post was published on eWillys November 15, 2014. I don’t normally post whole articles, but there is a great deal of interesting information within it. I’m reposting this today because there is some additional information about Mr. Clement Miniger and his Auto-Lite company leading a syndicate to buyout John North Willys’ stock in 1929 (Learn more about Miniger And Willys Light here).

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A variety of pre August 1946 CJ-2As in different colors waiting to be shipped from Willys-Overland’s Toledo plant.

This fascinating article was published in the August 1946 issue of Fortune magazine. It’s a LONG article that covers the history of Willys Overland Corporation from it’s bankruptcy in the early 1930s to it’s post-war market positioning. There is not much information specifically about jeeps, nor many jeeps photos. But, if you want to understand how the corporate structure evolved, it’s a good article.

One particular chart published in the article was Willys’ research on paved roads. The company felt that jeeps would be very popular in outer countries, due both to the brand and the lack of paved roads. To meet that demand, Willys planned to export 25% of all jeeps.

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WILLYS-OVERLAND

THIS JEEP-RIDING AUTO INDEPENDENT IS TAKING NEW LEASES ON LIFE AND ITS OWN REAL ESTATE • THE BOYS IN THE BACK ROOM ARE DOING FINE

ln the years between the depression and the second world war, the once great Willys-Overland Co. clung by its nails to a niche in the U.S. automobile market. Gamely, it tried to sell the public a mousy little car, with a tough, four-cylinder engine, which was the cheapest thing on the road to run. Itself battered into receivership and reorganization by the depression, Willys had the patently sensible idea that such a car, guaranteed to get people from here to there at a minimum expenditure for fuel and upkeep, would be a blessing to a hard-pressed public that had not been similarly served since the demise of the models T and A Ford. But the public was proud, if poor, and more conscious of the millinery than the engineering of a car. When it had to buy cheaply it found the used-car market much more tempting. During most of those years Willys’ production ranged below the break-even point. bln 1940, a mere 27,000 cars were built. Now Willys-Uverland is coming up for the postwar round with a product line still topped by a light passenger car-with a four or a six-cylinder engine, buyer’s choice. It will probably be as cheap to buy, give or take a few dollars, as any 1947 car on the market, and possibly less expensive to operate and support than any of its competitors. And though it will be considerably more stylish, inside and out, than the prewar Willys, it will have, at most, simple good looks rather than breath-taking beauty. If that were the whole story, one might wonder why some people think Willys-Overland is an exciting proposition among the auto independents today, and why some mighty big boys in the automobile industry appear to be sparring for position in the peculiar, complicated Willys-Overland hierarchy.

Unquestionably Willys has fresh charms. To name four:
1) The tough, four-cylinder motor that was the bread-and-butter item in the prewar Willys is the same motor that powered the Army Jeep, which became an international byword during the war. As the largest producer, by far, of the Jeep, Willys-Overland became the beneficiary of this enormous, war-born prestige (and also added a tidy sum to its treasury). Ten days after V-J day, Willys was in production on its civilian or Universal Jeep, of which it had sold around 28,000 by June 1, despite plant shutdowns totaling eighty-three days owing to strikes in suppliers’ plants.

2) Under way at its giant Toledo plant is a Jeep-inspired line of Willys utility vehicles including (a) an all-steel, all-purpose station wagon, (b) a sedan delivery truck, and (c) a low-weight, medium-duty truck with a combination four and two-wheel drive. All are powered by an improved four-cylinder Jeep engine and feature the Jeep snub nose and square fenders. All will be produced in 1946, and can be run through the same assembly line if necessary.

3) Because the rugged, lightweight vehicles in the Willys line are peculiarly suited to the exigencies of foreign motoring, in which the paucity of paved roads and the steep price of gasoline are forbidding factors, the company has decided to throw 25 per cent of its production into export. The development of a foreign market of such proportions is steadying to the seasonal economy of an automobile company. And Willys’ new top management is richly experienced in the export field.

4) Finally, many an economist, foreseeing an era of inflation, high taxes, and high gasoline costs, will agree that the hour in the oiiing is ripe for an automobile that places operating economy above fashion appeal. Willys is confident that its traditional economy car is, at last, accurately attuned to the times, and that its 1947 passenger model can bite into a solid and sustained market, both here and abroad.

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The 1959 Jeep Cavalcade “Rush to the Rockies” Centennial

• CATEGORIES: Features, Magazine, Old Images Jeeping • TAGS: .

UPDATE: Will Corbett shared this 1959 ‘Jeep’ Cavalcade “Rush to the Rockies” Centennial event brochure with Gone-Gpn on Facebook. It is a tri-fold brochure that opens up with a full-page on the back. I’ve pieced together the back page from two separate pages, so it isn’t quite a perfect example.

This is the front of the brochure:

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This is the back of the brochure:

1959-colorado-cavalcade-centential4This image shows the back of the brochure when fully opened:

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Originally Posted October 18, 2018:

This information covers the 1959 Jeep Cavalcade “Rush to the Rockies” Centennial. The 1959 Cavalcade was part of the 100th anniversary of the John Gregory’s Central City May 1859 strike, which led to a wave of hopeful miners descending upon what would become the Denver area. The Centennial was celebrate throughout Colorado through a variety of celebrations and merchandise (like these bottles and this Centential booklet).

A subsequent ‘Jeep’ Cavalcade was organized for 1960, as shown in this brochure.

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Photo from the Denver Post. Both Life Magazine and the Denver Post covered the event. Note the white wagon above. It appears in a couple of the color photos below.

Some folks attached these flags to their rigs.

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Here are photos of the 1959 Jeep Calvacade that appeared in the December 28, 1959, issue of Life Magazine (the one below).

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2-Inline Raditors on MB Build

• CATEGORIES: Features, Magazine, Unusual • TAGS: .

This unusual build appeared in the November 1964 issue of Four Wheeler Magazine. The build has two radiators, built in-line. I figured you all would enjoy this oddity.

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1962 Article on a CJ-5 Build

• CATEGORIES: Features, Magazine • TAGS: , , , .

This May 1962 article in Four Wheeler magazine highlighted a few things. First, it’s a really clean build. I wish the pics were in color, as it’s deserving of some great photos.

Second, if I understand correctly, the rear bumper is actually a gas tank. I’m not sure I like that plan so much.

Third, given this jeep is near Colorado Springs, it probably has the Thor Electro-matic hubs, which allow a push button engaging of the front hubs. And, because they are short hubs, the front wheel covers can be placed over them.

Fourth, this has an early vacuum brake assist. Herm carries a newer version of this.

Fifth, the White top on this jeep is beautifully styled in my opinion.

Photos

 
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1952 Photo of Jeeps in an Issue of National Geographic

• CATEGORIES: Features, Magazine, Old Images

The January 1952 issue of National Geographic included an expansive article on the King Ranch in Texas, which at the time was America’s largest ranch. One of the photos included in the article showed a CJ-3A (in black) and a CJ-2A (in green) towing farm implements.

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PHOTO CREDIT: Justin Locke using Kodachrome.

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1949 Trip Into Escalante from National Geographic

• CATEGORIES: Features, Magazine

UPDATE: Many folks probably haven’t seen this older post …

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UPDATED January 20, 2014: Here’s a jeep trip in 1955 that was undertaken after one of the trip’s members read the below article in National Geographic.

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Originally Posted October 23, 2013: 

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This spot is now a couple hundred feet under water. Learn more about the Crossing of the Fathers here: http://www.onlineutah.com/crossinghistory.shtml

In 1949 a joint expedition between the National Geographic Society and New York Explorers Club decided to be the first explorers, by vehicle, to enter the Escalante area of Utah. Accompanying the explorers were two jeeps and, fortunately for us, cameras. Their story, “The First Motor Sortie into Escalante Land”, appeared in the September 1949 issue (pages 169-204).

You can find a variety of inexpensive issues of the September 1949 National Geographic Magazine on eBay. If you are a fan of Southern Utah, this is a neat article.

For the first part of the trip, which began in Cannonville, Utah, the explorers traveled along part of the Cottonwood Road route we drove this past March. Their first big find was the arch we now know as the Grovesnor Arch, which the explorers officially named after the President of the National Geographic Society. What surprised me was that there are pictures showing the group on top of the arch with flags as if they’d conquered the moon. To be fair, I imagine it was a pretty challenging climb.

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Note the explorers at the top of the Grosvenor arch.

From there, the party headed south as far as the Colorado River to an area now flooded by Lake Powell. So, some of the areas in the photos are no longer possible to see.

Below are only the photos that include the red and yellow CJ-2As that accompanied the explorers:

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1946 X-Raying of a Jeep

• CATEGORIES: Features, Magazine, Old News Articles • TAGS: .
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This is a real X-ray of a real jeep developed as a life-size image. Life Magazine, March 25, 1946.

In 1946 the wiz kids at the University of Rochester, NY, and Eastman Kodak built the world’s largest radiograph, one that could create an X-Ray photo of a large machine, say a jeep, which is precisely how they tested it. In the jeep’s case, the team used the million-volt x-ray machine to create a radiograph 12′ 1″ long by 4′ 1″ tall, or large enough to contain a life size jeep. The larger goal was create the ability to X-Ray large machinery.

The February 8th, 1946, issue of Rochester Democrat Chronicle shared the story:

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The next month, Life Magazine also ran the story, this time with a copy of the X-ray photo (seen at top):

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The jeep’s hood number is 20200556

 
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Furgason’s ‘Jeep’ News Vol. 1 No. 1

• CATEGORIES: Advertising & Brochures, Features, Magazine

Evan Gillenwater posted the cover of this magazine to Facebook. He seems to think it came from Furgason’s Motors in La Grande, Oregon. The magazine was found at an antique store in New Hampshire.

Anyone recognize it?

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Cover of Colliers Magazine in 1946

• CATEGORIES: Artists/Drawings, Features, Magazine

UPDATE: I found an inexpensive issue of the February 2, 1946 Collier’s Magazine, so I scanned the cover. It has the Welcome Home Johnny sign celebrating’s soldiers homecoming as a farmer races his jeep down the road. I found no jeep related stuff on the inside.

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1945 BF-Goodrich Tires Ad on ebay

• CATEGORIES: Advertising & Brochures, Features, Magazine

This ad with women sipping tea while soldiers push through thick mud just expired on eBay, but will likely be relisted. It seems a bit unfair to women, as if they didn’t know a war was going on. I would imagine that most women likely were the main food shoppers and had to deal with shortages beyond just rubber.

View all the information on eBay

“Condition:  Near Mint
Size (approximate): 10″ X 12″
Source: Magazine
Miscellaneous: One page print advertisement”

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October 1952 Motor Trend Cover and Article

• CATEGORIES: Camping, Features, Magazine, Wood bodies • TAGS: .

As I was packing, I pulled this issue of Motor Trend aside. When I leafed through it, I realized there was a jeep-related article I missed. So, here the “Unique Cars for Sportsmen” by Jim Earp. All the vehicles herein are interesting. The first page has a pic at the bottom of Vic Hickey’s famous jeep.

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Winter 2020 Issue of the Dispatcher is Available

• CATEGORIES: Features, Magazine

The new issue of the Dispatcher Magazine has been released. Jim Allen’s article on the Jeep Creep and other prototypes in the late 1950s was very interesting (something I’ve never documented), as were the restoration articles on the Tonka Surreys and the Jeepster Convertible. As always, there’s lots of good stuff in this issue!

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December 1941 Pop Sci Article on Bantam BRC-40 T2E1s

• CATEGORIES: Bantam-FordGP-WillysMA-EarlyJPs, Features, Magazine, Old Images • TAGS: .

UPDATE: Originally published on February 02, 2014, the pop sci links no longer work, so I’ve now added the complete scan of the article.

This Bantam BRC-40 T2 article was published in December of 1941 in Popular Science (and possibly Mechanix Magazine) under “Tanks CAN Be Destroyed”. In it the author explores different machinery that can stop a tank. You can see variations from what could be the same photo shoot in this Bantam T2 & T2-E1 post.

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January 1950 Review of the Jeepster and Station Wagon

• CATEGORIES: Features, Magazine

Tom McCahill reviews the reviewed the Jeepster and Station Wagon in the January 1950 issue of Mechanic Illustrated . He liked the new four-wheel-drive wagon, but was less a fan of the Jeepster.

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“Streamlined” Jeeps From the Pacific

• CATEGORIES: Features, Magazine, Sedan-jeep • TAGS: , .

UPDATE: This post has been updated with a better version of the video:

The photos below are snapshots from the above video. They resemble the jeep shown below that was built by Wayne K. Pike. It was built by members of the 9th Service Squadron at the 13th Army Air Base on the island of Moratai. Note that it has a chrome/stainless trim strip absent from the car featured in the Popular Mechanics article below.

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ORIGINAL POST FEBRUARY 11, 2013:  You can view the entire Popular Mechanics’ issue on Google.

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Dec 1945 Popular Mechanics Page 6 Streamlined Jeep

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Dec 1945 Popular Mechanics Page 72 Jeep with Odd Body

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Dec 1945 Popular Mechanics Page 77 Men using Jeep like a plow horse

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Dec 1945 Popular Mechanics Page 73 Men us jeep to fix propeller

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Dec 1945 Popular Mechanics Page 70 Fixing Jeep Frame

 
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August 1949 Toy Wagon Build From Mechanix Illustrated

• CATEGORIES: Features, Magazine, toys

The August 1949 issue of Mechanix Illustrated included detailed plans for constructing a battery powered, remote-control toy wagon.
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Philadelphia’s Road Patrol Service

• CATEGORIES: Features, Magazine, Old Images

This article in the June 28, 1948, issue of Newsweek covers how the Keystone Automobile Club’s three jeeps were transformed into mobile video units for the 1948 Republican and Democratic Conventions that were being held in Philadelphia.

Six months earlier in January, the same jeeps had been setup with radios to help manage road patrol issues (multiple news articles mentioned this), so adding television service expanded, albeit temporarily, the capabilities of the jeeps.

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Last year we saw a different pic of one of the jeeps that is housed in Philadlephia’s free library:

 
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Feb 1957 Science and Mechanics FC-150 Blurb

• CATEGORIES: Features, Magazine

The February 1957 issue of Science and Mechanics introduced readers to the FC-150 with this short article.
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Dec. 1945 Outdoor Life Magazine Story on the Jeep

• CATEGORIES: Artists/Drawings, Features, Magazine

UPDATE: Originally Posted July 26, 2014. There is currently an issue for $7 on eBay.

The December 1945 Issue of Outdoor Life Magazine contained an article titled “A Jeep Will Get You There”. It is filled with photos of a VEC CJ-2A used for a fishing trip. The photos aren’t the best, but still an interesting article. Outdoor Life also featured the story on the front cover.

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1944 Forbes Article on the Peacetime Jeep

• CATEGORIES: Features, Magazine

This Forbes November 15, 1944, article titled “Will the Jeep Invade Peacetime Markets” is a pretty sober look at the reality of the WWII jeep. That’s probably because the author, Francis “Frank” Fenn, was the former President of American Bantam at the time the Bantam BRC was developed (one person argued that Frank was the actual father of the jeep).

With tweaks to the basic WWII jeep, Fenn predicted the CJ could do quite a bit, but would never make a good around-town or travel car due to it’s rough ride and basic functions. He predicted, rightly, that it would take a quite a bit of engineering for the vehicle to meet the average family’s on-road needs.

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October 1976 Article on Jeeps made by Volkswagen

• CATEGORIES: Features, International, Magazine

Scott directed me to an article in the October 1976 issue of South Africa’s CAR Magazine. It highlighted the jeeps that Volkswagen, having secured a license from AMC, was building in South Africa. Below is a copy from the article.  CAR Magazine still exists; you can find it on Facebook and on the Web.

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August 1958 CJ-3B Farm Jeep Ad **SOLD**

• CATEGORIES: Advertising & Brochures, Features, International, Magazine

UPDATE: **SOLD** Was on eBay.

This ad was published in an Australian farming magazine.

“Australian Jeep Original Advertisement removed from a 1958 Australian Farming Magazine and in good condition for age having some marks and creases and age yellowing of the paper. Size is 18 cms x 24 cms.  It would look good framed on your wall or displayed with your vehicle at a car show.”

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Summer 2020 Dispatcher Magazine

• CATEGORIES: Features, Magazine

The Sumer 2020 Dispatcher Magazine arrived in my mailbox this weekend. Jim Allen’s feature article on the Jeepster Commando designs was particularly interesting. I knew there were a variety, but I didn’t know there were this many!

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Africa U.S.A. and Jeeps

• CATEGORIES: Features, Magazine, Old Images, Postcards

UPDATE: This post is an aggregation of Africa USA postcards and articles. Another postcard from the form adventure park popped up on eBay, this time with a CJ-5 pulling the trams:

View all the information on eBay

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Posted June 2019 on eBay, a CJ-3B pulling trams:

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From 2015: Africa USA, was part of a theme-park movement in the late 1950s that included New York’s Freedomland, Disneyland, Wisconsin’s Fort Dells, and others. By 1959, these parks were collectively generating revenue of $2 billion.

There is a feature article about these parks in the August 1, 1960, issue of Life Magazine. The picture below is from that article. You can take a ‘virtual’ jeep-train tour of Africa USA here (don’t expect much)

This article appeared in the December 1955 issue of Willys News. That’s the jeep train behind the animals.

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1941 Look Magazine Article “Hell on Wheels”

• CATEGORIES: Bantam-FordGP-WillysMA-EarlyJPs, Features, Magazine

The August 26, 1941, issue of Look Magazine included this large photo of a Bantam BRC-40. The caption, presumably written by the author of the article, Henry McLemorehistor reads:

THIS MOBILE CHIROPRACTOR I am driving is a half-ton reconnaissance car known to the unit as a Peep or Bo-Peep. It’ll go 60 mph, packs two machine guns, a crew of four. It will take you anywhere, provided you can hang on–actually covering worse terrain than a tank. As soon as the Army has enough Peeps, they will replace motorcycles as dispatch and reconnaissance vehicles. Like all armored-division vehicles, the Peep has four-wheel drive and handles as easily as the highest priced pleasure car. The difference is that you sit on a thin cushion over a steel seat and buckle yourself down with an airplane safety belt. “

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The above photo is from this two page spread:

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This is the magazine cover:

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