Features Research Archives

To Top

Jeeps in Production

• CATEGORIES: Features, Library Collections, War Images • TAGS: .

Here are 3 images taken by Alfred Palmer in December of 1941.  These three photographs were taken at the Toledo Willys Plant. There are other images that show the machines used to manufacture parts, but I didn’t really find them very interesting.

Library of Congress Link for the below photo

Library of Congress link for the below photo


Library of Congress link for the below photo

 
To Top

Australian Troops in New Guinea

• CATEGORIES: Features, Library Collections, War Images • TAGS: .

Here some pics of Australian Troops during WWII from the Library of Congress.

Taken in March, 1943, In New Guinea.  This Willys serves as an ambulance for Australian troops in New Guinea. Library of Congress

Here’s some troops navigating through some muck. This convoy is carrying military chiefs and cabinet ministers on a visit to battle areas in New Guinea. Air Vice-Marshall G. Jones is shown in the leading vehicle during the tour of the convoy.  Library of Congress

This image might not be Australian Troops, but it is supposed to be taken in October of 1942 in Australia.  Library of Congress.

Soldiers, wounded in the fighting in New Guniea, are carried to a base.  Library of Congress.

This was taken in March of 1943.  Australian troops and supplies go to the front line at Buna.  Library of Congress.

 
To Top

Reason #63 for a trip to Italy

• CATEGORIES: Features, Fire/Police/Industry Vehicles, Museums, Old Images, Website

Some of the folks over at the ww2talk.com website had a discussion regarding the Museo Storico Piana delle Orme – Latina (Italy).    The museum describes itself as a “historical theme park designed to accommodate one of the largest and most diverse collections in the world: planes, tanks, locomotives, wagons, radio, weapons and hundreds of military vehicles, agricultural tractors, threshers, trams and coaches, tools and thousands of objects of all types and sizes. Dedicated to the twentieth century, the Museum is a journey through 50 years of Italian history. 14 themed to tell the traditions and culture of the peasant, the great works of improvement, the Second World War but also to show the vehicles and means at the dawn of industrialization and great toys with which children entertained themselves.

For the purposes of ewillys, the highlight of the trip might just be the opportunity to check out these two modified flatties a little closer (ok, hopefully we could find many more highlights as well!)

In the foreground, we have a MB that has been converted into a tow truck.  Behind, and to the left, is a jeep with a water tank(?) on the back of it.  Maybe a water transporter?  This photo was taken by “Captain Bill”.

 
To Top

Anyone know anything about these trucks?

• CATEGORIES: CJ-2A, Features, Old Images, Willys Trucks • TAGS: .

Doing some research on Warn hubs this morning, I ran across this image on Warn’s corporate website.  This may very well be  the original Warn Motor’s Service station in Seattle, Washington, where Arthur Warn developed his early ‘Summer Hubs’ as Mike refers to them.  Note the signs atop the roof, “Jeeps”  and “Warn Motors”.

If there were just one of these trucks, i would call it a custom one-off project.  However, two of these suggest to me this was a kit of some kind?  It kind of looks like the prototype for the Willys we have named a Tender.

 
To Top

Robison’s Typewriter and Cash Register Repair

• CATEGORIES: Features, Old Images, Willys Wagons

I wish I had found a complete picture of this truck from Camden, NJ, but it appears we’ll have to make due with a partial image.  I think that’s supposed to be a wooden typewriter on top. Here’s the original link.

“Sitting on the wall are Mr. Robison’s nephews and niece, Tony, Annamarie and Joe Di Paola Jr.  
In the background, parked on the Haddon Avenue side of 964 Pine Street is the Willys truck belonging to Robison’s Typewriter and Cash Register Repair.”

 
To Top

Coast Guard Anti-Saboteur Patrol

• CATEGORIES: Features, Library Collections, War Images • TAGS: .

I haven’t seen too many Coast Guard Willys Pics.  According to the Library of Congress, here’s one from April 1943.

The Library of Congress’ caption to this photo is:  Coast Guard anti-saboteur patrol. Vital cargoes of war supplies for America’s far-flung battle lines must also be protected on the docks and piers from enemy attempts at sabotage. The Coast Guard now uses jeeps with armed Coast Guardsmen maintaining vigilant waterfront patrols.

 
To Top

Dan Details the Thor “Lectro-Matic” Hub

• CATEGORIES: Builds, Features

Dan dropped this into my inbox this evening.  It’s a detailed look at the Thor “Lectro-Matic” Hub (or lectromatic hub). Dan completed this 18 page document, with disassembling the hubs and discussing each step.  You can download the PDF here Great work Dan!

Dan writes, The Thor “Lectro-Matic” hubs off of my 1955 CJ-5 were a bit of a mystery. These must have been some of the first “push button” 4WD systems to come out. There was little to no information on them so I decided to take them apart and see just how they work. Here is what I have learned.

When my Dad said that they were electric, I assumed that they had a little motor that would “spin” them in or out of engagement. What I realized was that they were more like a solenoid or electromagnet.

There is a coil of wire on the wheel side of the hub. When power is applied to the coil it becomes a magnet and draws itself to the axle side of the hub. There are little “teeth” machined into the facing sides of the hub. These teeth engage and the axle side of the hub turns the wheel or magnet side of the hub. A wire is ran through the back of the backing plate through a hole and provides the electricity to the magnetic coil. A contact mounted on a spring transmits this electric power through a slip ring inside the brake drum to the hub.

I imagine that the hubs could be engaged while the vehicle is moving, but I think this would cause the teeth to slip for a moment and lead to premature wear of the teeth. A toggle switch or a maintained push button could be used to turn the hubs on and off. One could even use a limit switch on the 4WD lever of the transfer case to automatically turn them on when the vehicle was shifted into 4WD. The hubs would only remain engaged as long as power is applied to the magnetic coil. If you left the switch on and had run power directly off of the battery to the switch, it would eventually drain your battery after the engine is shut off. If you ran power from the ignition switch to the on/off switch, your hubs would automatically disengage as soon as you shut off your engine.

If for some reason they didn’t want to work, there was a little screw on the outside face of the hub that you could turn to manually engage or disengage the hubs (as you can see below).


On the top of the hub you can see the wire that passes through the brake drum to power the magnetic coil.

Download and read the entire document here

 
To Top

The MB Chapel

• CATEGORIES: Features, Library Collections, MB, Old Images, War Images

I’ve seen a few pics that show the jeep as a temporary place for worship.  This is another image from Roy O. Bingham.  The Library of Congress reports that in this pic, “Members of the Tenth Mountain Division, 605th Artillery Battalion, attend a Protestant Easter religious service at Rocca Pitigliano, Italy, conducted by Chaplain William H. Bell. In the foreground, four men bow their heads together. Corporal Ralph Squires sits at a portable organ and two soldiers face the Chaplain who stands in front of his jeep draped with a white cloth in use as an altar for a small crucifix.”

Library of Congress

 
To Top

Seeps: These Sea Jeeps Get Ready to Serve

• CATEGORIES: Features, GPA (SEEP), Library Collections, War Images, Women & Jeeps • TAGS: .

Paul (of stainless M-38 friend) told me a couple days ago that he has a friend (whom he calls Crazy Ralphie) who has been restoring a GPA.  He’s promised to provide us with some pics once the Alaska winter subsides a bit.  In the meantime, here are some SEEP images I found at the Library of Congress.  I have seen a few of these in books, but none as crisp as below.

Ice is no barrier to this prototype Ford-built amphibian car. According to Mark Askew in his book Rare WW2 Photo Archive 1940 – 1945 which shows this image and other prototypes of the SEEP, this photo was taken in February 1941 near the Ford Plant in Dearborn, Mi.   Library of Congress

After breaking through the shore ice, the Ford-built amphibian car makes its way through ice floes and water at a good speed.  Library of Congress

The Ford-built amphibian car can handle itself on rough ground. This picture shows a test driver putting one of them through its paces.  Mark also features this image in his bookLibrary of Congress

Here’s a photo of tests on the Rogue River near the Ford Plant.  Library of Congress

Here’s another shot from the Rogue River. Library of Congress

Below is a production SEEP.   Note the ribs on the side. I believe this photo is from maneuvers held in the Detroit area, when soldiers from Fort Wayne in full combat dress manned the machines Library of Congress

The picture below shows maneuvers held in the Detroit area, when soldiers from Fort Wayne in full combat dress manned the machines. Library of Congress

The two photos below were taken by Arthur Siegel.  During WWII he worked for the Office of War Information (OWI).  These two were taken in April of 1943.  Library of Congress

Library of Congress

 
To Top

Artist and Army Captain Ed Reep

• CATEGORIES: Artists/Drawings, Features, War Images

Another artist featured in the PBS series They Drew Fire, Combat Artists of World War II, Ed Reep, captured this scene.  While he tries to paint the image colorfully, there’s no doubt, based on his description, that his subject had an unimaginably colorful character.  After ending the war as an Army Captain, Ed would go on to teach at the Art Center College at East Carolina University and the California Institute of the Arts.

Ed writes, “There was a fellow who hauled a bathtub out of Notuno, and filled it with water, and then he punched a hole in the gas tank and lit it. The painting was nutty. That’s all there was to it. How in the world could this man be smiling on a beach-head where shell fire would come all the time, constantly?”  You can see this painting on PBS’s Website. This painting is currently located at the U.S. Army Center for Military History in Washington, D.C.

 
To Top

Newspaper Articles from 1945 introducing the Jeep

• CATEGORIES: Features, Old News Articles

UPDATE: The links to the PDFs are fixed.

Among the digitized items Bruce has sent me comes these articles.  In this one, from the Hammond Times, July 23, 1945, Willys Overland introduces the new Post-War Jeep.  What’s interesting is that it’s neither an “ad” nor is it really an article.  You can view the entire PDF here.

Even more interesting was the pricing decision.  These new Willys would cost $1000, a price not set by Willys Overland, but instead by the Office of Price Administration (OPA).  This information comes from a July 31, 1945 article, in the Vidette-Messenger, Valparaiso, Indiana. Here’s the full PDF and an excerpt below.

 
To Top

Food, Jeeps, GIs and Photos

• CATEGORIES: Features, Library Collections, War Images • TAGS: .

Photographer Roy O. Bingham followed the 10th Mountain Division through at least part of Italy during World War II.  I searched for some information on Bingham and though I found photos, I haven’t found any biography information yet.

During World War II, the 10th Mountain Division trained in Colorado in anticipation of fighting in the Italian Alps.  You can see a variety of his pics at the Denver Library’s online collection of Western History and Genealogy, specifically their 10th Mountain Division Collection.

The following photo was snapped by Bingham and the 2nd is of Bingham himself.  Library of Congress

Roy O Bingham.  Library of Congress

This photo was taken by Richard A. Rocker, who was also a photographer with the 10th Mountain Division.   You can see a variety of his pics at the Denver Library’s online collection of Western History and Genealogy,

The soldiers in this photo were likely parked amongst the rubble of a shelled town called Pietra Colora.  According to the photographer, they are listening to the sound of German artillery falling nearby and preparing to take cover if the rounds start falling closer.  Library of Congress

 
To Top

Some Drawings by Howard Brodie

• CATEGORIES: Artists/Drawings, Features, War Images

Thanks to Robert for providing me a good link into the Library of Congress for these and many other pics to be displayed later.

By all accounts a life long artist, Howard Brodie has captured sports figures, war events, legal battles and more with his drawing talents.  He sketched his way through several wars, from World War II in Guadacanal, the Battle of the Bulge and more, to Korea, French Indochina, and Vietnam.  As best I can tell, he is still alive and, hopefully, drawing at his home in San Miguel, California.  He is currently being featured by PBS as part of a series called They Drew Fire, Combat Artists of World War II.

In this sketch, American soldiers in a jeep travel down the road to Kokumbona on Guadalcanal island, past abandoned Japanese field pieces during the World War II Battle of Guadalcanal.  Library of Congress.

In this sketch, soldiers are taking a “K.I.A.” down a jeep trail from Mt. Aestin Guadalcanal. Library of Congress

 
To Top

Roberto Flores, Illustrator Extraordinaire

• CATEGORIES: Artists/Drawings, Comics, Features • TAGS: .

If you are a regular reader of the CJ-3B page, you have likely seen Roberto’s drawings and maybe saw his CJ-3B, too.  At CJ-3A.com you’ll see his work at the top left.  If you haven’t, I’ve add a few images of his drawings and his jeeps below for your enjoyment.  You can find Roberto in a variety of places on the internet, including his own website, his blog, another blog and online store.  He lives in Spain, but I think is recognized, at least by old school Willys lovers, world-wide.  Thanks for sharing and keep up the great work!

Here’s some pics of Roberto’s CJ-3B and I believe that’s his CJ-3A (I didn’t get any info on that)?

Here are some of Roberto’s drawings.

The first is a comic for “4×4 Story Magazine Spécial Jeep” issue 26, Mai-Juin 2009.  It is a French bimonthly magazine, based on the adventures of collectors and restorers of jeeps. Original size, 21 cms. x 14,8 cms.

This is a commissioned drawing ordered cartoon for a French customer, over cardboard. The characters which appear on this are the customer, driving his Willys jeep “Follow Me”, from WW2. He´s accompanied by his wife and son.  Acrylics over carboard. Dimmenssions: 42 x 29.7 cms.

This is a logo drawn for a page on jeep Willys MB/Ford GPW of World War II. Pencil and computer on paper.

Here’s a full list of links:

 
To Top

Rusting Jeeps in Okinawa, Japan, and Puson, Korea

• CATEGORIES: Features, GPW (Ford MB), MB, Old Images, Website

UPDATE: I added this post in January of last year with just the single image (the first one below).  Today, David pointed me to the Tahiti-pacifique.com website that has a few more images, which follow the first image.  You can learn more about these pics at that site.

(01/31/09) Robert pointed me to a collection of Life Magazine photos of old jeeps hosted at Google.  Click on the photo and then click on it again to see all kinds of details.

jeeps_rusting_okinawa_japan

 
To Top

Argosy

• CATEGORIES: Features, Magazine

Published in the U.S. for 96 years, under a few different names, Argosy was a sometimes weekly, sometimes monthly Men’s literary magazine with topics and purposes that varied over its existence.  Always literary, sometimes totally fiction and sometimes part fiction, part fact and, near the end, soft porn.  I’ve never personally read the magazine, but Bob found the issue with the cover below and  forwarded me the link to the image shown below.  Wikipedia notes that at one point, Argosy was associated with “the men’s adventure pulp genre of “true” stories of conflict with wild animals or wartime combat”.  In the case of the issue below, I think it managed to combine ‘wartime’, ‘conflict’ and ‘wild animals’.

 

 
To Top

Images from the Mid East?

• CATEGORIES: Features, Old Images

I think at least some of these images are from Israel?  If not, I believe they are from that general area.

The first one might be the newest.  I’m not sure if the grilles and fenders are armored or not, but most certainly appear heavy duty.

Note how thin and tall the tires are on this jeep.

Now, that seat below can’t be comfortable for long drives!

In the two pics below, the people look like they are from ‘Rat Patrol, The Reality Series’.  I think either the jeep in this first pic is a 1948 or the image was taken in 1948?

 

 
To Top

Chris’ DJ-3A

• CATEGORIES: Builds, DJ-3A, Features

Searching for something else, I discovered Chris Kelley’s blog and his new Willys: a 1956 DJ-3A with 4wd.  I’ve seen enough DJ-3As with 4wd that I asked Bruce if he knew whether any DJ-3As came with a 4wd package, but to the best of his knowledge (which is the best I know of) he said there was no 4wd option of which he was aware.

Chris writes on his website about new purchase (sept 7 09) “Yep, you’re looking at a 1956 (sort of) CJ3a (sort of) Willy’s Overland Jeep (completely!).  Its sort of a 56 since that’s what the tub plate says.  Its also only sort of a CJ3A since the tub plate also says its a DJ3a, which was a 2 wheel drive version made for the postal service and other delivery trucks.  However, my best guess is that someone replaced the original tub with the one it has now, since this does have 4WD.”

It’s a good looking jeep, though there’s a small ding in the passenger rear, and here some pics from his site:

 
To Top

Dinner Time at the Rusty Jeep Hickory Pit

• CATEGORIES: Features, Monuments/Statues • TAGS: , .

If you are like me, you love to eat slow, pit cooked meat (pork, beef, bison, chicken, and just about anything else).  Actually, I’m partial to Kalua Pork, named not for the beverage, but rather for the method of cooking:  Kalua Pork translates as “to cook in an underground oven”.  Now, I don’t have an underground over, but I have a heavy crock pot.  All you need is about 5lbs of pork butt or a picnic cut, a table spoon of liquid smoke and a table spoon and a half of salt.  Drop it into your pot (don’t add water).  Turn it on high.  Wait 5 or 6 hours.  Throw in about 1/4 cabbage sliced.  Cook another half hour, and it will be done:  I guarantte you will have some fantastic Kalua Pork.  Easy and nutritious.

But, if you don’t feel like cooking your own pork and you are near Port Aransas, Tx, then drop by the Rusty Jeep Hickory Pit.  And, of course, there’s even a rusty jeep in the parking lot (which no doubt ran until it was parked? lol).  Josh’s sister sent him some pics, seen below, and I found a few additional pics on the net (thanks Josh).

The sign below is attached to the front grille of the jeep.

 
To Top

Book: Willy – The Little Jeep

• CATEGORIES: Books, Features, Fire/Police/Industry Vehicles

Here’s a kid’s book called Willy:  The Little Jeep Who Wanted to Be a Fire Truck.  I haven’t read it yet, but it’s supposed to be based loosely on a real event and a real 1947 CJ-2A.  The book has its own website.

From Amazon.com, “Join Willy as his dream of becoming a fire truck takes some surprising twists and turns. Travel with him on an adventure that brings him from the sidelines to center stage and safely back home again.

Written originally as a Christmas present for a friend, WILLY has already captivated children of all ages. As one reviewer noted, “The book is written for a child, but has so much meaning for adults as well. I don’t mind admitting that a tear of joy rolled down my ‘headlight’ too!” Others have described Willy as “lovable,” “endearing,” and “plain ol’ fun.”

The story, penned by volunteer firefighter Don Estes, is based on actual events that happened in Clinton Corners, New York and Clinton, Connecticut.”

View all the information at Amazon

 
To Top

Photo of Jeep during Prohibition $10

• CATEGORIES: Features, News, Old Images, Women & Jeeps

After seeing this ad multiple times, it got to me.  The seller claims in each ad that the photo below was taken during the Prohibition era.

I mean, c’mon, how difficult is it to look up Prohibition (1919 -1933) and look up when jeeps were built (nothing before 1940).  I mean, am I asking so much?

Now here’s a more complete version of the picture.  Note the jeep is atop wood slats which are atop beer bottles.

Ok, here’s the best one I found.  I thought I had posted it previously.

and a pic of the Andrew sisters .. is that them?  Could be.

 
To Top

Classic Men’s Magazines & a Jeep Image

• CATEGORIES: Artists/Drawings, Features, Magazine, Old Images

My jaw dropped as I opened the magazine.  I was in my early teens (mid 70s).  To this day, I’m unsure why my father hid a couple Playboy magazines in with my mother’s stash of old magazines (I’m guessing he never thought she would look there?).  But, sure enough, in my hands was gold, my eyes were big, and it was coooool!  And thus, that was my first introduction to Playboy.

I can’t say I’ve done much research into the history of Playboy, but during a search of vintage magazines in general, I came across a website called Stagmags.com, which appears to be a gathering and recording of many old ‘stag’ magazines that have since gone out of publication.  It’s a reminder that Playboy had plenty of competition from day 1, but to Hef’s credit, managed to successfully carve out a successful niche, while many others failed.

Now, I only bring this up as a segway to one of two images I found on the page and which you can view below.  Hopefully that provides a little more insight into the image.

stagmags_com_image

 
To Top

Builds: 1947 CJ-2A with Detailed L-Head Rebuild

• CATEGORIES: Builds, Features

Any of you Pirate 4×4 readers might have seen this thread about a 1947 CJ-2A rebuild (and I should probably spend more time on Pirate as I really haven’t spent any time at all on the site), but this is a nice detailed review of an L-head rebuild, frame restoration, disk brake installation on the original running gear, and  more.  Lots of pics and thoughtful, intelligent discussions.

Click here to see the entire build process

Here’s a few pics:  The beginning, a $2800 jeep from Port Angeles, Wa.  It’s in good condition, but will benefit from a rebuild.

pirate_build_1947_cj2a_1

Here it is partially dissassembled:

pirate_build_1947_cj2a_2

Here the engine is going back together.  BTW, did you know you can ‘borrow’ those pistron compressors through Schucks/Autozone as part of their lend a tool program:

pirate_build_1947_cj2a_3

The engine is more put together:

pirate_build_1947_cj2a_4

Here’s an updated master cylinder:

pirate_build_1947_cj2a_5

This is part of the brake discussion:

pirate_build_1947_cj2a_6

And here the jeep is back together:

pirate_build_1947_cj2a_7

 
To Top

1991 YJ + 1954 Wagon Fenders =?

• CATEGORIES: Builds, Features

The Israeli bureau (Or  Shahar) found this interesting project.  I think this build works better than I might have expected. The builder blended the truck fenders with the front clip of the YJ rather nicely.  There’s still plenty left to be done;  I look forward to seeing the final product.

“Ed started with a 1991 YJ with 4” lift, 15×10 alloys and 31×11.50 Thornbirds. While using the YJ’s hood, grill, tub and inner fenders he gained access to a 1954 Willys pickup and was able to blend the old Willys front and rear fenders to the YJ body giving the Jeep that retro “flattie” look. He said “you won’t believe how well the 2 meld together. I was going to build flat fenders (myself), but after a friend of mine who has a Willys Pickup, Wagon, and a Jeepster said he had some extra fenders (that cinched it).”

See the rest of the pics at http://www.4-the-love-of-jeeps.com/jeep-project.html

1991YJWillysProjectEdward1

1991YJWillysProjectEdward5fender

1991YJWillysProjectEdward6frt

 
To Top

Some Dealership Pics From Hemmings

• CATEGORIES: Features, Old Images • TAGS: .

I found some Willys-Overland black and white pics from this Hemmings Blog Post.

factory_jamboree

pioneergarage_03_resized

pioneergarage_02_resized